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Title: Kinetic Coupling of Water Splitting and Photoreforming on SrTiO 3 -Based Photocatalysts

Abstract

Coupling the anodic half-reactions of overall water splitting and oxygenate photoreforming (i.e., proton reduction and oxygenate oxidations) on Al-doped SrTiO3 decorated with a co-catalyst enables efficient photocatalytic H2 generation along with oxygenate conversion without accumulating undesired intermediates such as formaldehyde. The net H2-evolution rates result from the interplay between water oxidation, oxygenate oxidation, and the back-reaction of H2 and O2 to water. When the latter pathway is quantitatively suppressed (e.g., on RhCrOx co-catalyst or in excess of oxygenated hydrocarbons), the initial H2-evolution rates are independent of the oxygenate nature and concentration. This is a consequence of the reduction equivalents for H2-evolution provided by water oxidation compensating changes in the rates of oxygenate conversion. Thus, under conditions of suppressed back-reaction, water and oxygenate oxidations have equal quantum efficiencies. The selectivities to water and oxygenate oxidation depend on oxygenate nature and concentration. Transformations mediated by indirect hole transfer dominate as a result of the water oxidation at the anode and the associated intermediates generated in O2-evolution catalysis (e.g. ·OH, ·O and ·OOH). On the undecorated semiconductor, the O2 produced during overall water splitting is reductively activated to participate in glycerol oxidation without consuming evolved H2. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thankmore » ESRF in Grenoble, France, for providing beam time at the ID26 station for XAFS experiments. K.E.S. gratefully acknowledges financial support by the Fond der Chemischen Industrie (FCI). J.A.L. and O.Y.G. acknowledge support for his contribution by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a multi-program national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The authors thank Xaver Hecht for BET measurements, Martin Neukamm for SEM and AAS measurements and Dr. Udishnu Sanyal for TEM imaging. Christine Schwarz is acknowledged for technical assistance in NMR experiments.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Department of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center, TU München, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747 Garching, Germany
  2. Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States
  3. Department of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center, TU München, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747 Garching, Germany; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1434859
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-126051
Journal ID: ISSN 2155-5435; KC0302010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Catalysis; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sanwald, Kai E., Berto, Tobias F., Jentys, Andreas, Camaioni, Donald M., Gutiérrez, Oliver Y., and Lercher, Johannes A. Kinetic Coupling of Water Splitting and Photoreforming on SrTiO 3 -Based Photocatalysts. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b03192.
Sanwald, Kai E., Berto, Tobias F., Jentys, Andreas, Camaioni, Donald M., Gutiérrez, Oliver Y., & Lercher, Johannes A. Kinetic Coupling of Water Splitting and Photoreforming on SrTiO 3 -Based Photocatalysts. United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b03192.
Sanwald, Kai E., Berto, Tobias F., Jentys, Andreas, Camaioni, Donald M., Gutiérrez, Oliver Y., and Lercher, Johannes A. Mon . "Kinetic Coupling of Water Splitting and Photoreforming on SrTiO 3 -Based Photocatalysts". United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b03192.
@article{osti_1434859,
title = {Kinetic Coupling of Water Splitting and Photoreforming on SrTiO 3 -Based Photocatalysts},
author = {Sanwald, Kai E. and Berto, Tobias F. and Jentys, Andreas and Camaioni, Donald M. and Gutiérrez, Oliver Y. and Lercher, Johannes A.},
abstractNote = {Coupling the anodic half-reactions of overall water splitting and oxygenate photoreforming (i.e., proton reduction and oxygenate oxidations) on Al-doped SrTiO3 decorated with a co-catalyst enables efficient photocatalytic H2 generation along with oxygenate conversion without accumulating undesired intermediates such as formaldehyde. The net H2-evolution rates result from the interplay between water oxidation, oxygenate oxidation, and the back-reaction of H2 and O2 to water. When the latter pathway is quantitatively suppressed (e.g., on RhCrOx co-catalyst or in excess of oxygenated hydrocarbons), the initial H2-evolution rates are independent of the oxygenate nature and concentration. This is a consequence of the reduction equivalents for H2-evolution provided by water oxidation compensating changes in the rates of oxygenate conversion. Thus, under conditions of suppressed back-reaction, water and oxygenate oxidations have equal quantum efficiencies. The selectivities to water and oxygenate oxidation depend on oxygenate nature and concentration. Transformations mediated by indirect hole transfer dominate as a result of the water oxidation at the anode and the associated intermediates generated in O2-evolution catalysis (e.g. ·OH, ·O and ·OOH). On the undecorated semiconductor, the O2 produced during overall water splitting is reductively activated to participate in glycerol oxidation without consuming evolved H2. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank ESRF in Grenoble, France, for providing beam time at the ID26 station for XAFS experiments. K.E.S. gratefully acknowledges financial support by the Fond der Chemischen Industrie (FCI). J.A.L. and O.Y.G. acknowledge support for his contribution by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a multi-program national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The authors thank Xaver Hecht for BET measurements, Martin Neukamm for SEM and AAS measurements and Dr. Udishnu Sanyal for TEM imaging. Christine Schwarz is acknowledged for technical assistance in NMR experiments.},
doi = {10.1021/acscatal.7b03192},
journal = {ACS Catalysis},
number = 4,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Mon Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}