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Title: Remote Drying in the North Atlantic as a Common Response to Precessional Changes and CO 2 Increase Over Land

Abstract

Here we demonstrate that changes of the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH) and its regional rainfall pattern during mid-Holocene precessional changes and idealized 4xCO2 increase can both be understood as a remote response to changes in the African and Indian monsoon systems. Despite different sources and patterns of radiative forcing (increase in CO2 concentration vs. changes in orbital parameters), we find that the pattern of energy, circulation, and rainfall responses in the Northern Hemisphere summer subtropics are very similar in the two forcing scenarios because both are dominated by the same land-sea heating contrast in response to the forcing. An increase in energy input over land drives a westward displacement of the coupled NASH-monsoon circulation, consistent with increased precipitation in the Afro-Asia region and decreased precipitation in the America-Atlantic region. Ultimately, this study underscores the importance of land heating in dictating remote drying through zonal shifts of the subtropical circulation.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Scientific User Facilities Division
OSTI Identifier:
1434850
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-131183
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276; KP1703010
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830; E-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters; Journal Volume: 0; Journal Issue: 0
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
NASH; CO2; rainfall; radiative forcing

Citation Formats

Kelly, Patrick, Kravitz, Ben, Lu, Jian, and Leung, L. Ruby. Remote Drying in the North Atlantic as a Common Response to Precessional Changes and CO2 Increase Over Land. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/2017GL076669.
Kelly, Patrick, Kravitz, Ben, Lu, Jian, & Leung, L. Ruby. Remote Drying in the North Atlantic as a Common Response to Precessional Changes and CO2 Increase Over Land. United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL076669.
Kelly, Patrick, Kravitz, Ben, Lu, Jian, and Leung, L. Ruby. Mon . "Remote Drying in the North Atlantic as a Common Response to Precessional Changes and CO2 Increase Over Land". United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL076669.
@article{osti_1434850,
title = {Remote Drying in the North Atlantic as a Common Response to Precessional Changes and CO2 Increase Over Land},
author = {Kelly, Patrick and Kravitz, Ben and Lu, Jian and Leung, L. Ruby},
abstractNote = {Here we demonstrate that changes of the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH) and its regional rainfall pattern during mid-Holocene precessional changes and idealized 4xCO2 increase can both be understood as a remote response to changes in the African and Indian monsoon systems. Despite different sources and patterns of radiative forcing (increase in CO2 concentration vs. changes in orbital parameters), we find that the pattern of energy, circulation, and rainfall responses in the Northern Hemisphere summer subtropics are very similar in the two forcing scenarios because both are dominated by the same land-sea heating contrast in response to the forcing. An increase in energy input over land drives a westward displacement of the coupled NASH-monsoon circulation, consistent with increased precipitation in the Afro-Asia region and decreased precipitation in the America-Atlantic region. Ultimately, this study underscores the importance of land heating in dictating remote drying through zonal shifts of the subtropical circulation.},
doi = {10.1002/2017GL076669},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 0,
volume = 0,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}