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Title: Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils

Abstract

Climate change-induced perturbations in the hydrologic regime are expected to impact biogeochemical processes, including contaminant mobility and cycling. Elevated levels of geogenic and anthropogenic arsenic are found along many coasts around the world, most notably in south and southeast Asia but also in the United States, particularly along the Mid-Atlantic coast. The mechanism by and the extent to which arsenic may be released in contaminated coastal soils due to sea level rise are unknown. Here we show a series of data from a coastal arsenic-contaminated soil exposed to sea and river waters in biogeochemical microcosm reactors across field-validated redox conditions. We find that reducing conditions lead to arsenic release from historically contaminated coastal soils through reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing mineral oxides in both sea and river water inundations, with less arsenic release from seawater scenarios than river water due to inhibition of oxide dissolution. For the first time, we systematically display gradation of solid phase soil-arsenic speciation across defined redox windows from reducing to oxidizing conditions in natural waters by combining biogeochemical microcosm experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, our results demonstrate the threat of sea level rise stands to impact arsenic release from contaminated coastal soils by changing redoxmore » conditions.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States)
  2. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  4. Univ. of Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1434765
Report Number(s):
BNL-203482-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; sea level rise; arsenic, geochemistry; soil chemistry; XANES; redox

Citation Formats

LeMonte, Joshua J., Stuckey, Jason W., Sanchez, Joshua Z., Tappero, Ryan, Rinklebe, Jorg, and Sparks, Donald L. Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b06152.
LeMonte, Joshua J., Stuckey, Jason W., Sanchez, Joshua Z., Tappero, Ryan, Rinklebe, Jorg, & Sparks, Donald L. Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b06152.
LeMonte, Joshua J., Stuckey, Jason W., Sanchez, Joshua Z., Tappero, Ryan, Rinklebe, Jorg, and Sparks, Donald L. Thu . "Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b06152. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1434765.
@article{osti_1434765,
title = {Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils},
author = {LeMonte, Joshua J. and Stuckey, Jason W. and Sanchez, Joshua Z. and Tappero, Ryan and Rinklebe, Jorg and Sparks, Donald L.},
abstractNote = {Climate change-induced perturbations in the hydrologic regime are expected to impact biogeochemical processes, including contaminant mobility and cycling. Elevated levels of geogenic and anthropogenic arsenic are found along many coasts around the world, most notably in south and southeast Asia but also in the United States, particularly along the Mid-Atlantic coast. The mechanism by and the extent to which arsenic may be released in contaminated coastal soils due to sea level rise are unknown. Here we show a series of data from a coastal arsenic-contaminated soil exposed to sea and river waters in biogeochemical microcosm reactors across field-validated redox conditions. We find that reducing conditions lead to arsenic release from historically contaminated coastal soils through reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing mineral oxides in both sea and river water inundations, with less arsenic release from seawater scenarios than river water due to inhibition of oxide dissolution. For the first time, we systematically display gradation of solid phase soil-arsenic speciation across defined redox windows from reducing to oxidizing conditions in natural waters by combining biogeochemical microcosm experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, our results demonstrate the threat of sea level rise stands to impact arsenic release from contaminated coastal soils by changing redox conditions.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.6b06152},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 11,
volume = 51,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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Cited by: 12works
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