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Title: Final Technical Report DE-EE0006911 Vermont Solar Pathways

Abstract

Solar PV is the fastest-growing form of energy in Vermont. From 2012 to 2017, Vermont’s solar energy capacity increased almost nine times to 227 MW, a compound annual growth rate of 54%. During this time, the portion of electricity from solar grew from 0.5% to 5%. The state is one of the national leaders in net metering, community solar, and solar jobs per capita. In 2011, the Vermont Comprehensive Energy Plan set a goal to have renewable energy supply 90% of the state’s total energy needs (including electricity, heating and cooling, and transportation) by 2050. The Department of Public Service completed a Total Energy Study to examine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of various paths to the 90% goal and related emissions goals. The General Assembly created a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that includes credit for projects—such as electric vehicles and modern wood heating—that switch end uses away from fossil fuel, making the RPS essentially a total energy portfolio standard. Achieving the state’s energy goals will require major contributions from distributed resources and the development of supporting infrastructure such as energy storage, electric vehicle charging stations, and upgraded distribution systems. The Vermont Solar Pathways project used scenario modeling and stakeholder engagementmore » to create a broadly supported plan to get 20% of the state’s electricity from solar by 2025. Scenario modeling provided numbers and graphs for examining issues, costs, and benefits, and spurred discussions at the 11 stakeholder meetings held over the course of the project. Stakeholders provided feedback to improve the model and made suggestions for variations on the scenarios.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Vermont Energy Investment Corp., Burlington, VT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Vermont Energy Investment Corp., Burlington, VT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
Contributing Org.:
Regulatory Assistance Project (RAP) Vermont Department of Public Service
OSTI Identifier:
1434651
Report Number(s):
DOE-VEIC-EE0006911
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0006911
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: The four volume final report is available at vermontsolarpathways.org
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Lane, Damon, and Hill, David. Final Technical Report DE-EE0006911 Vermont Solar Pathways. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1434651.
Lane, Damon, & Hill, David. Final Technical Report DE-EE0006911 Vermont Solar Pathways. United States. doi:10.2172/1434651.
Lane, Damon, and Hill, David. Fri . "Final Technical Report DE-EE0006911 Vermont Solar Pathways". United States. doi:10.2172/1434651. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1434651.
@article{osti_1434651,
title = {Final Technical Report DE-EE0006911 Vermont Solar Pathways},
author = {Lane, Damon and Hill, David},
abstractNote = {Solar PV is the fastest-growing form of energy in Vermont. From 2012 to 2017, Vermont’s solar energy capacity increased almost nine times to 227 MW, a compound annual growth rate of 54%. During this time, the portion of electricity from solar grew from 0.5% to 5%. The state is one of the national leaders in net metering, community solar, and solar jobs per capita. In 2011, the Vermont Comprehensive Energy Plan set a goal to have renewable energy supply 90% of the state’s total energy needs (including electricity, heating and cooling, and transportation) by 2050. The Department of Public Service completed a Total Energy Study to examine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of various paths to the 90% goal and related emissions goals. The General Assembly created a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that includes credit for projects—such as electric vehicles and modern wood heating—that switch end uses away from fossil fuel, making the RPS essentially a total energy portfolio standard. Achieving the state’s energy goals will require major contributions from distributed resources and the development of supporting infrastructure such as energy storage, electric vehicle charging stations, and upgraded distribution systems. The Vermont Solar Pathways project used scenario modeling and stakeholder engagement to create a broadly supported plan to get 20% of the state’s electricity from solar by 2025. Scenario modeling provided numbers and graphs for examining issues, costs, and benefits, and spurred discussions at the 11 stakeholder meetings held over the course of the project. Stakeholders provided feedback to improve the model and made suggestions for variations on the scenarios.},
doi = {10.2172/1434651},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}