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Title: Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging Devices

Abstract

HyperV Technologies Corp. has successfully designed, built and experimentally demonstrated a full scale 1024 pixel 100 MegaFrames/s fiber coupled camera with 12 or 14 bits, and record lengths of 32K frames, exceeding our original performance objectives. This high-pixel-count, fiber optically-coupled, imaging diagnostic can be used for investigating fast, bright plasma events. In Phase 1 of this effort, a 100 pixel fiber-coupled fast streak camera for imaging plasma jet profiles was constructed and successfully demonstrated. The resulting response from outside plasma physics researchers emphasized development of increased pixel performance as a higher priority over increasing pixel count. In this Phase 2 effort, HyperV therefore focused on increasing the sample rate and bit-depth of the photodiode pixel designed in Phase 1, while still maintaining a long record length and holding the cost per channel to levels which allowed up to 1024 pixels to be constructed. Cost per channel was 53.31 dollars, very close to our original target of $50 per channel. The system consists of an imaging "camera head" coupled to a photodiode bank with an array of optical fibers. The output of these fast photodiodes is then digitized at 100 Megaframes per second and stored in record lengths of 32,768 samplesmore » with bit depths of 12 to 14 bits per pixel. Longer record lengths are possible with additional memory. A prototype imaging system with up to 1024 pixels was designed and constructed and used to successfully take movies of very fast moving plasma jets as a demonstration of the camera performance capabilities. Some faulty electrical components on the 64 circuit boards resulted in only 1008 functional channels out of 1024 on this first generation prototype system. We experimentally observed backlit high speed fan blades in initial camera testing and then followed that with full movies and streak images of free flowing high speed plasma jets (at 30-50 km/s). Jet structure and jet collisions onto metal pillars in the path of the plasma jets were recorded in a single shot. This new fast imaging system is an attractive alternative to conventional fast framing cameras for applications and experiments where imaging events using existing techniques are inefficient or impossible. The development of HyperV's new diagnostic was split into two tracks: a next generation camera track, in which HyperV built, tested, and demonstrated a prototype 1024 channel camera at its own facility, and a second plasma community beta test track, where selected plasma physics programs received small systems of a few test pixels to evaluate the expected performance of a full scale camera on their experiments. These evaluations were performed as part of an unfunded collaboration with researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at Davis. Results from the prototype 1024-pixel camera are discussed, as well as results from the collaborations with test pixel system deployment sites.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1433921
DOE Contract Number:
SC0009492
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; camera; plasma jet; plasma diagnostics; imaging; fast imaging; photodiode; fiber bundle imaging

Citation Formats

Brockington, Samuel, Case, Andrew, and Witherspoon, Franklin Douglas. Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging Devices. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1433921.
Brockington, Samuel, Case, Andrew, & Witherspoon, Franklin Douglas. Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging Devices. United States. doi:10.2172/1433921.
Brockington, Samuel, Case, Andrew, and Witherspoon, Franklin Douglas. Sun . "Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging Devices". United States. doi:10.2172/1433921. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1433921.
@article{osti_1433921,
title = {Fast Fiber-Coupled Imaging Devices},
author = {Brockington, Samuel and Case, Andrew and Witherspoon, Franklin Douglas},
abstractNote = {HyperV Technologies Corp. has successfully designed, built and experimentally demonstrated a full scale 1024 pixel 100 MegaFrames/s fiber coupled camera with 12 or 14 bits, and record lengths of 32K frames, exceeding our original performance objectives. This high-pixel-count, fiber optically-coupled, imaging diagnostic can be used for investigating fast, bright plasma events. In Phase 1 of this effort, a 100 pixel fiber-coupled fast streak camera for imaging plasma jet profiles was constructed and successfully demonstrated. The resulting response from outside plasma physics researchers emphasized development of increased pixel performance as a higher priority over increasing pixel count. In this Phase 2 effort, HyperV therefore focused on increasing the sample rate and bit-depth of the photodiode pixel designed in Phase 1, while still maintaining a long record length and holding the cost per channel to levels which allowed up to 1024 pixels to be constructed. Cost per channel was 53.31 dollars, very close to our original target of $50 per channel. The system consists of an imaging "camera head" coupled to a photodiode bank with an array of optical fibers. The output of these fast photodiodes is then digitized at 100 Megaframes per second and stored in record lengths of 32,768 samples with bit depths of 12 to 14 bits per pixel. Longer record lengths are possible with additional memory. A prototype imaging system with up to 1024 pixels was designed and constructed and used to successfully take movies of very fast moving plasma jets as a demonstration of the camera performance capabilities. Some faulty electrical components on the 64 circuit boards resulted in only 1008 functional channels out of 1024 on this first generation prototype system. We experimentally observed backlit high speed fan blades in initial camera testing and then followed that with full movies and streak images of free flowing high speed plasma jets (at 30-50 km/s). Jet structure and jet collisions onto metal pillars in the path of the plasma jets were recorded in a single shot. This new fast imaging system is an attractive alternative to conventional fast framing cameras for applications and experiments where imaging events using existing techniques are inefficient or impossible. The development of HyperV's new diagnostic was split into two tracks: a next generation camera track, in which HyperV built, tested, and demonstrated a prototype 1024 channel camera at its own facility, and a second plasma community beta test track, where selected plasma physics programs received small systems of a few test pixels to evaluate the expected performance of a full scale camera on their experiments. These evaluations were performed as part of an unfunded collaboration with researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at Davis. Results from the prototype 1024-pixel camera are discussed, as well as results from the collaborations with test pixel system deployment sites.},
doi = {10.2172/1433921},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 22 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Sun Apr 22 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

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