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Title: Advanced Materials and Technologies for Resilient Infrastructure Systems

Abstract

Infrastructure is largely unnoticed until it breaks down and services fail. This includes water supplies, gas pipelines, bridges and highways, phone lines and cell towers, and the electric grid — all of the complex systems that keep our societies and economies running. The secure and reliable functioning of our nation’s critical infrastructure is required; however, U.S. infrastructures face a rising frequency and severity of natural disasters (Figure 1), and a growing number and sophistication of physical and cyber attacks. With increasing technological and economic progress, infrastructures are growing more interconnected, necessitating new considerations for their security. Recent disasters such as Superstorm Sandy provide profound insights into how non-linear interactions combine with network effects to trigger a cascade of events across interdependent systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Argonne National Laboratory; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1433498
Report Number(s):
ANL-18/05
142714
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kim, H., Clifford, M. C., Darling, S. B., Snyder, S. W., Chen, C., Kaminski, M., Heifetz, A., Sumant, A. V., Hardy, K., Biruduganti, M., and Macal, C. Advanced Materials and Technologies for Resilient Infrastructure Systems. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1433498.
Kim, H., Clifford, M. C., Darling, S. B., Snyder, S. W., Chen, C., Kaminski, M., Heifetz, A., Sumant, A. V., Hardy, K., Biruduganti, M., & Macal, C. Advanced Materials and Technologies for Resilient Infrastructure Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1433498.
Kim, H., Clifford, M. C., Darling, S. B., Snyder, S. W., Chen, C., Kaminski, M., Heifetz, A., Sumant, A. V., Hardy, K., Biruduganti, M., and Macal, C. Thu . "Advanced Materials and Technologies for Resilient Infrastructure Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1433498. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1433498.
@article{osti_1433498,
title = {Advanced Materials and Technologies for Resilient Infrastructure Systems},
author = {Kim, H. and Clifford, M. C. and Darling, S. B. and Snyder, S. W. and Chen, C. and Kaminski, M. and Heifetz, A. and Sumant, A. V. and Hardy, K. and Biruduganti, M. and Macal, C.},
abstractNote = {Infrastructure is largely unnoticed until it breaks down and services fail. This includes water supplies, gas pipelines, bridges and highways, phone lines and cell towers, and the electric grid — all of the complex systems that keep our societies and economies running. The secure and reliable functioning of our nation’s critical infrastructure is required; however, U.S. infrastructures face a rising frequency and severity of natural disasters (Figure 1), and a growing number and sophistication of physical and cyber attacks. With increasing technological and economic progress, infrastructures are growing more interconnected, necessitating new considerations for their security. Recent disasters such as Superstorm Sandy provide profound insights into how non-linear interactions combine with network effects to trigger a cascade of events across interdependent systems.},
doi = {10.2172/1433498},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Technical Report:

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