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Title: Molecular Insights into Arctic Soil Organic Matter Degradation under Warming

Abstract

Molecular composition of the Arctic soil organic carbon (SOC) and its susceptibility to microbial degradation are uncertain due to heterogeneity and unknown SOC compositions. By using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry, we determined the susceptibility and compositional changes of extractable dissolved organic matter (EDOM) in an anoxic warming incubation experiment (up to 122 days) with a tundra soil from Alaska (United States). EDOM was extracted with 10 mM NH 4HCO 3 from both the organic- and mineral-layer soils during incubation at both -2 and 8°C. Based on their O:C and H:C ratios, EDOM molecular formulas were qualitatively grouped into nine biochemical classes of compounds, among which lignin-like compounds dominated both the organic and the mineral soils and were the most stable, whereas amino sugars, peptides, and carbohydrate-like compounds were the most biologically labile. These results corresponded with shifts in EDOM elemental composition in which the ratios of O:C and N:C decreased, while the average C content in EDOM, molecular mass, and aromaticity increased after 122 days of incubation. This research demonstrates that certain EDOM components, such as amino sugars, peptides, and carbohydrate-like compounds, are disproportionately more susceptible to microbial degradation than others in the soil, and these results should be considered inmore » SOC degradation models to improve predictions of Arctic climate feedbacks.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  3. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1433414
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1437889
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Chen, Hongmei, Yang, Ziming, Chu, Rosalie K., Tolic, Nikola, Liang, Liyuan, Graham, David E., Wullschleger, Stan D., and Gu, Baohua. Molecular Insights into Arctic Soil Organic Matter Degradation under Warming. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.7b05469.
Chen, Hongmei, Yang, Ziming, Chu, Rosalie K., Tolic, Nikola, Liang, Liyuan, Graham, David E., Wullschleger, Stan D., & Gu, Baohua. Molecular Insights into Arctic Soil Organic Matter Degradation under Warming. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.7b05469.
Chen, Hongmei, Yang, Ziming, Chu, Rosalie K., Tolic, Nikola, Liang, Liyuan, Graham, David E., Wullschleger, Stan D., and Gu, Baohua. Fri . "Molecular Insights into Arctic Soil Organic Matter Degradation under Warming". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.7b05469.
@article{osti_1433414,
title = {Molecular Insights into Arctic Soil Organic Matter Degradation under Warming},
author = {Chen, Hongmei and Yang, Ziming and Chu, Rosalie K. and Tolic, Nikola and Liang, Liyuan and Graham, David E. and Wullschleger, Stan D. and Gu, Baohua},
abstractNote = {Molecular composition of the Arctic soil organic carbon (SOC) and its susceptibility to microbial degradation are uncertain due to heterogeneity and unknown SOC compositions. By using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry, we determined the susceptibility and compositional changes of extractable dissolved organic matter (EDOM) in an anoxic warming incubation experiment (up to 122 days) with a tundra soil from Alaska (United States). EDOM was extracted with 10 mM NH4HCO3 from both the organic- and mineral-layer soils during incubation at both -2 and 8°C. Based on their O:C and H:C ratios, EDOM molecular formulas were qualitatively grouped into nine biochemical classes of compounds, among which lignin-like compounds dominated both the organic and the mineral soils and were the most stable, whereas amino sugars, peptides, and carbohydrate-like compounds were the most biologically labile. These results corresponded with shifts in EDOM elemental composition in which the ratios of O:C and N:C decreased, while the average C content in EDOM, molecular mass, and aromaticity increased after 122 days of incubation. This research demonstrates that certain EDOM components, such as amino sugars, peptides, and carbohydrate-like compounds, are disproportionately more susceptible to microbial degradation than others in the soil, and these results should be considered in SOC degradation models to improve predictions of Arctic climate feedbacks.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.7b05469},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 8,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Fri Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/acs.est.7b05469

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