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Title: Review of the Effects of CO2 on Very-Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rock/Shale – Part II: Clay Mineral & Shale Response to Hydration

Abstract

Carbon Storage TRS

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory - Energy Data eXchange; NETL
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1432988
Report Number(s):
68913329-03d5-45bc-b32a-a7e8e763b10a
DOE Contract Number:
1022403
Resource Type:
Data
Data Type:
Figures/Plots
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Carbon Storage; TRS; clay mineral and shale; fine-grained rock

Citation Formats

Angela Goodman. Review of the Effects of CO2 on Very-Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rock/Shale – Part II: Clay Mineral & Shale Response to Hydration. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.18141/1432988.
Angela Goodman. Review of the Effects of CO2 on Very-Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rock/Shale – Part II: Clay Mineral & Shale Response to Hydration. United States. doi:10.18141/1432988.
Angela Goodman. Fri . "Review of the Effects of CO2 on Very-Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rock/Shale – Part II: Clay Mineral & Shale Response to Hydration". United States. doi:10.18141/1432988. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1432988.
@article{osti_1432988,
title = {Review of the Effects of CO2 on Very-Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rock/Shale – Part II: Clay Mineral & Shale Response to Hydration},
author = {Angela Goodman},
abstractNote = {Carbon Storage TRS},
doi = {10.18141/1432988},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Dataset:

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  • Smectites and mixed-layer illite/smectite clays from a suite of core samples drawn from the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (USGS borehole S6) have been examined using analytical electron microscopy (AEM) and x-ray diffraction. Samples from 784 and 808 m deep are fine and coarse-grained, respectively. An intermediate sample (806-m depth) is a sandy siltstone with conspicuous shale intraclasts. The fine and mixed grain-size samples are characterized by illitic clays (14% expandable, ordered; 21% expandable, random). The coarse-grained sample is, by contrast, highly expandable (96%). All AEM analyses were performed at {minus}150{degree}C to minimize electron beam damage and retardmore » loss of volatile interlayer cations. Interlayer sites for clays in all of these samples are dominated by Na and K with minor Ca. Mixed-layer clays of the fine-grained and intraclast-bearing units are characterized by high K/Na in interlayer sites, and clays of the coarse-grained sample include Na-rich varieties. All of the clays are dioctahedral. The octahedral chemistry of each sample is dominated by Al, Mg, and divalent Fe. The proportion of Al to divalent cations in the octahedral layer ranges from three to four in all samples. Charge on the TOT layer of the clays spans the expected range from illite to smectite. Some of this variation may indicate that detrital illites or mixed-layer materials were present in the fraction analyzed. These data may reflect compositional variation of the diagenetic fluids that percolated through fine and coarse-grained units of the Westwater Canyon member.« less
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  • Amounts and ratios of hydrocarbons in nonreservoir rocks (potential source rocks) can be compared with associated oils if, in relatively old and stable geologic situations, the hydrocarbons reach or closely approach a distribution equilibrium between source rock and reservoir. A distribution-equilibrium equation makes possible the calculation of the composition of a hypothetical oil expected from the composition of the hydrocarbons in the nonreservoir rock and from the different tendencies of the hydrocarbons to be absorbed in the rock and in the oil. In application, the absorbing tendencies have been measured and the hypothetical oil compositions calculated and compared with thosemore » of tthe real oils. The hypothetial and actual oil compositions agree very well in some relatively old and deep sedimentary deposits in which the source rocks and associated oils probably are related genetically. On the other hand, there is relatively poor agreement in some relatively young and shallow deposits, but the agreement appears to improve with increasing depth and age. One explanation for this is that the hydrocarbons in the relatively young and shallow oils may not be related genetically to associated young and shallow source rocks, but came from older and deeper ones. Alternatively the hydrocarbons in the young and shallow reservoirs and in the associated source rocks, in fact, may be related genetically but do not appear to be in distribution equilibrium because primary migration is still occurring. These findings imply that certain petroleum components, particularly the saturated hydrocarbons, are generated and migrate over relatively long periods of time. The results also may imply that the generation of petroleum components in fine-grained sedimentary rocks causes primary migration.« less