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Title: Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions

Abstract

The research program supported by this DOE grant carried out both methodological development and computational applications of first-principles theoretical chemistry based on quantum mechanical wavefunctions, as directed toward understanding and harnessing the fundamental chemical physics of combustion. To build and refine the world’s database of thermochemistry, spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics, predictive and definitive computational methods are needed that push the envelope of modern electronic structure theory. The application of such methods has been made to gain comprehensive knowledge of the paradigmatic reaction networks by which the n- and i-propyl, t-butyl, and n-butyl radicals are oxidized by O 2. Numerous ROO and QOOH intermediates in these R + O 2 reaction systems have been characterized along with the interconnecting isomerization transition states and the barriers leading to fragmentation. Other combustion-related intermediates have also been studied, including methylsulfinyl radical, cyclobutylidene, and radicals derived from acetaldehyde and vinyl alcohol. Theoretical advances have been achieved and made available to the scientific community by implementation into PSI4, an open-source electronic structure computer package emphasizing automation, advanced libraries, and interoperability. We have pursued the development of universal explicitly correlated methods applicable to general electronic wavefunctions, as well as a framework that allows multideterminant reference functions tomore » be expressed as a single determinant from quasiparticle operators. Finally, a rigorous analytical tool for correlated wavefunctions has been created to elucidate dispersion interactions, which play essential roles in many areas of chemistry, but whose effects are often masked and enigmatic. Our research decomposes and analyzes the coupled-cluster electron correlation energy in molecular systems as a function of interelectronic distance. Concepts are emerging that can be used to explain the influence of dispersion on the thermochemistry of large hydrocarbons, including fuels important to combustion technologies.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1432179
Report Number(s):
DOE-UGA-15512
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0015512
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Allen, Wesley D., and Schaefer, Henry F. Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1432179.
Allen, Wesley D., & Schaefer, Henry F. Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions. United States. doi:10.2172/1432179.
Allen, Wesley D., and Schaefer, Henry F. Sun . "Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions". United States. doi:10.2172/1432179. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1432179.
@article{osti_1432179,
title = {Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions},
author = {Allen, Wesley D. and Schaefer, Henry F.},
abstractNote = {The research program supported by this DOE grant carried out both methodological development and computational applications of first-principles theoretical chemistry based on quantum mechanical wavefunctions, as directed toward understanding and harnessing the fundamental chemical physics of combustion. To build and refine the world’s database of thermochemistry, spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics, predictive and definitive computational methods are needed that push the envelope of modern electronic structure theory. The application of such methods has been made to gain comprehensive knowledge of the paradigmatic reaction networks by which the n- and i-propyl, t-butyl, and n-butyl radicals are oxidized by O2. Numerous ROO and QOOH intermediates in these R + O2 reaction systems have been characterized along with the interconnecting isomerization transition states and the barriers leading to fragmentation. Other combustion-related intermediates have also been studied, including methylsulfinyl radical, cyclobutylidene, and radicals derived from acetaldehyde and vinyl alcohol. Theoretical advances have been achieved and made available to the scientific community by implementation into PSI4, an open-source electronic structure computer package emphasizing automation, advanced libraries, and interoperability. We have pursued the development of universal explicitly correlated methods applicable to general electronic wavefunctions, as well as a framework that allows multideterminant reference functions to be expressed as a single determinant from quasiparticle operators. Finally, a rigorous analytical tool for correlated wavefunctions has been created to elucidate dispersion interactions, which play essential roles in many areas of chemistry, but whose effects are often masked and enigmatic. Our research decomposes and analyzes the coupled-cluster electron correlation energy in molecular systems as a function of interelectronic distance. Concepts are emerging that can be used to explain the influence of dispersion on the thermochemistry of large hydrocarbons, including fuels important to combustion technologies.},
doi = {10.2172/1432179},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}