skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience (SUPER): University of Utah Final Report

Abstract

Over the course of this project, computational scientists working on behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE SC) were exploiting a new generation of petascale computing resources to make previously inaccessible discoveries in a broad range of disciplines including physics, chemistry and material science. The computational systems underpinning this work increased in performance potential from tens to hundreds of Pflop/s, and evolved significantly from those in use at the beginning of the project in terms of available concurrency; wider use of accelerators such as graphics processing units(GPUs); and changes to the memory hierarchy including the incorporation of a new generation of persistent devices (e.g., phase change memory). To ensure that DOE's computational scientists can successfully exploit this emerging generation of high performance computing (HPC) systems, the University of Southern California (USC) assembled a broad team of computer scientists with the expertise to address the most pressing challenges of DOE's computing systems: (a) end-to-end performance optimization, including single-node performance, interprocessor communication, load balancing and I/O; (b) performance portability for heterogeneous systems, including accelerators; (c) minimizing energy consumption; (d) resilient computation; and, (e) exploiting new memory technology.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21)
OSTI Identifier:
1432044
Report Number(s):
Final Report
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0006947
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; performance optimization

Citation Formats

Hall, Mary. Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience (SUPER): University of Utah Final Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1432044.
Hall, Mary. Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience (SUPER): University of Utah Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1432044.
Hall, Mary. Fri . "Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience (SUPER): University of Utah Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1432044. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1432044.
@article{osti_1432044,
title = {Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience (SUPER): University of Utah Final Report},
author = {Hall, Mary},
abstractNote = {Over the course of this project, computational scientists working on behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE SC) were exploiting a new generation of petascale computing resources to make previously inaccessible discoveries in a broad range of disciplines including physics, chemistry and material science. The computational systems underpinning this work increased in performance potential from tens to hundreds of Pflop/s, and evolved significantly from those in use at the beginning of the project in terms of available concurrency; wider use of accelerators such as graphics processing units(GPUs); and changes to the memory hierarchy including the incorporation of a new generation of persistent devices (e.g., phase change memory). To ensure that DOE's computational scientists can successfully exploit this emerging generation of high performance computing (HPC) systems, the University of Southern California (USC) assembled a broad team of computer scientists with the expertise to address the most pressing challenges of DOE's computing systems: (a) end-to-end performance optimization, including single-node performance, interprocessor communication, load balancing and I/O; (b) performance portability for heterogeneous systems, including accelerators; (c) minimizing energy consumption; (d) resilient computation; and, (e) exploiting new memory technology.},
doi = {10.2172/1432044},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}