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Title: Molecular modeling of multicomponent glass and glass surfaces for nuclear waste glass dissolution and glass-to-metal seals applications.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1431641
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-3629C
652313
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 253rd ACS National & Exposition held April 2-6, 2017 in San Francisco, California.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Criscenti, Louise. Molecular modeling of multicomponent glass and glass surfaces for nuclear waste glass dissolution and glass-to-metal seals applications.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Criscenti, Louise. Molecular modeling of multicomponent glass and glass surfaces for nuclear waste glass dissolution and glass-to-metal seals applications.. United States.
Criscenti, Louise. Sat . "Molecular modeling of multicomponent glass and glass surfaces for nuclear waste glass dissolution and glass-to-metal seals applications.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1431641.
@article{osti_1431641,
title = {Molecular modeling of multicomponent glass and glass surfaces for nuclear waste glass dissolution and glass-to-metal seals applications.},
author = {Criscenti, Louise},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • Glass dissolution takes place through metal leaching and hydration of the glass surface accompanied by development of alternation layers of varying crystallinity. The reaction which controls the long-term glass dissolution rate appears to be surface layer dissolution. This reaction is reversible because the buildup of dissolved species in solution slows the dissolution rate due to a decreased dissolution affinity. Glass dissolution rates are therefore highly dependent on silica concentrations in solution because silica is the major component of the alteration layer. Chemical modeling of glass dissolution using reaction path computer codes has successfully been applied to short term experimental testsmore » and used to predict long-term repository performance. Current problems and limitations of the models include a poorly defined long-term glass dissolution mechanism, the use of model parameters determined from the same experiments that the model is used to predict, and the lack of sufficient validation of key assumptions in the modeling approach. Work is in progress that addresses these issues. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Requirements for the formation of a strong, hermetic seal between a glass-ceramic and a metal, in actuator and detonator applications, were reviewed. The necessary parameters are: (1) a high strength metal; (2) a match in the thermal expansion coefficient between the metal and glass-ceramic; (3) wettability of the metal by the glass; and (4) the chemical compatibility at the glass-ceramic/metal interface at sealing temperatures. An Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer, acting as a buffer between the glass and the metal, should be included to protect the metal from the glass attack. A model was proposed and tested with an aluminum-containing alloymore » (899) which formed a tightly adhering Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer when pre-sealed heated in air. This Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer was verified by Auger electron spectroscopy and is wettable by the glass and chemically compatible with it, as seen in the optical photomicrographs. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the oxide layer and the alumina-rich glass/oxide boundary were found to be acceptable. 23 refs., 7 figs.« less