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Title: SPE - Geologic Characterization.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1431610
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-3251PE
652062
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the National Security Applications Research and Development Portfolio Review held April 3 - March 10, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Abbott, Robert. SPE - Geologic Characterization.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Abbott, Robert. SPE - Geologic Characterization.. United States.
Abbott, Robert. Wed . "SPE - Geologic Characterization.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1431610.
@article{osti_1431610,
title = {SPE - Geologic Characterization.},
author = {Abbott, Robert},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • Abstract not provided.
  • The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSSmore » (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a “calibration” shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for laboratory tests (to be reported by SNL). A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the U-15n#10 angle core hole between the drilled depths of 149 and 155 ft (straight-line distance or range station [RS] from the shot point of 7.5 to 5.7 m). However, several of the fractures observed in the U-15n#10 hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. These fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets. The most distant fracture from the shot point that could be interpreted as having been caused by the explosion was seen at approximately RS 10.0 m. No other possibly explosion-induced fractures are apparent above the fault, but are common starting at RS 5.4 m, which is below the fault. It is unknown how the fault zone might have affected the propagation of seismic waves or how the materials in the fault zone (altered granite, breccia, gouge) were affected by the explosion. From RS 3.3 m to the end of the recovered core at RS 1.6 m, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.« less
  • The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE-N test series ismore » designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE-N-1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 100 kg of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE-N-3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE-N-2, and at the same depth as SPE-N-2, within the damage zone created by the SPE-N-2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE-N-2 shot and prior to the SPE-N-3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The objective was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE-N-2 core hole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for measurement of physical and mechanical properties. A video was also run in the source hole after it was cleaned out. A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the angle core hole between 5.7 and 7.5 m from the shot point. However, several of the fractures observed in the core hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. The fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets; they are common starting at about 5.4 m from the shot point. Within about 3.3 m of the shot point to the end of the recovered core at 1.6 m from the shot point, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.« less
  • The West Short Pine Hills field produces natural gas from shallow marine sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Shannon Formation in the Williston basin of northwestern South Dakota. These sandstones were deposited as a series of submarine bars at least 175 mi east of equivalent shoreline deposits and represent one sequence of multiple submarine bars which are sporadically developed on the Shannon paleosea floor. With the exception of the Cady Creek field to the south, the nearest Shannon production is more than 125 mi away in the Powder River basin. Core analysis of the Shannon at West Short Pine Hills fieldmore » show that reservoir characteristics here are somewhat different from what has been reported in other Shannon fields in the region. The Shannon here has been divided into five facies types which represent a complete depositional cycle; complete cycles are, however, rarely preserved because of migration of the sandbars and reworking due to storm surges and ocean currents. Effective reservoir communication in the field is provided for by intercommunication among sand-filled burrows and trails, which bring thin-bedded, laterally discontinuous sands into communication with more massively bedded units. The result is an internal boxwork network of narrow permeability conduits within normally tight, very low-permeability facies. Some fracturing may be operative in parts of the field to further enhance communication, although none was seen in core.« less
  • Geologic and hydrologic studies clarify coalbed methane reservoir characteristics of the Fruitland Formation. In geologic studies, data from geophysical logs were used to map coal (reservoir) occurrence and structural features; fractures in coal seams were described at outcrops and in cores. In hydrologic studies, Fruitland bottom-home pressures calculated from well head and pressure regime and to estimate vertical and lateral pressure gradients. Chemical facies of produced waters were defined by Piper and Stiff ionic-ratio diagrams. The thickest coal seams trend northwestward and occur in the north-central part of the basin; these seams are the most permeable units in the Fruitlandmore » Formation. In the southwest part of the basin, coal seams trend either northwestward or northeastward. Coal trends are predictable and are controlled by depositional setting. Fracture trends in coal seams in the southern two-thirds of the basin are north-northeast, whereas fracture trends in the northern third of the basin and underpressured in much of the rest of the basin. Overpressuring is attributed to artesian conditions. Large vertical and/or lateral pressure gradients indicate reservoir heterogeneity. Low-chloride, high-alkalinity waters coincide with overpressuring, and saline NaCl-type waters coincide with underpressuring. Geologic studies delineated coalbed methane reservoirs (coal seams), whereas hydrologic studies indicated reservoir conditions such as permeability and pressure regime. By integrating geologic and hydrologic findings, the authors divided the San Juan basin into regions having similar reservoir characteristics and defined areas with optimal conditions for coalbed methane production. The approaches used in this study are transferable to other coal basins.« less