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Title: Structure and properties of visible-light absorbing homodisperse nanoparticle

Abstract

Broadly, the scientific progress from this award focused in two main areas: developing time-resolved X-ray diffraction methods and the synthesis and characterization of molecular systems relevant to solar energy harvesting. The knowledge of photo–induced non–equilibrium states is central to our understanding of processes involved in solar–energy capture. More specifically, knowledge of the geometry changes on excitation and their relation to lifetimes and variation with adsorption of chromophores on the substrates is of importance for the design of molecular devices used in light capture.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1431315
Report Number(s):
DOE-UB-15372
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-02ER15372
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY

Citation Formats

Benedict, Jason. Structure and properties of visible-light absorbing homodisperse nanoparticle. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1431315.
Benedict, Jason. Structure and properties of visible-light absorbing homodisperse nanoparticle. United States. doi:10.2172/1431315.
Benedict, Jason. Thu . "Structure and properties of visible-light absorbing homodisperse nanoparticle". United States. doi:10.2172/1431315. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1431315.
@article{osti_1431315,
title = {Structure and properties of visible-light absorbing homodisperse nanoparticle},
author = {Benedict, Jason},
abstractNote = {Broadly, the scientific progress from this award focused in two main areas: developing time-resolved X-ray diffraction methods and the synthesis and characterization of molecular systems relevant to solar energy harvesting. The knowledge of photo–induced non–equilibrium states is central to our understanding of processes involved in solar–energy capture. More specifically, knowledge of the geometry changes on excitation and their relation to lifetimes and variation with adsorption of chromophores on the substrates is of importance for the design of molecular devices used in light capture.},
doi = {10.2172/1431315},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Thu Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Technical Report:

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