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Title: Low Loss Graded Index Polymer Optical Fiber for Local Networking

Abstract

Here, the objective of this Department of Energy SBIR program has been to develop technology for the advancement of advanced computing systems. NanoSonic worked with two subcontractors, the Polymicro Division of Molex, a U.S.-based manufacturer of specialized optical fiber and fiber components, and Virginia Tech, a research university involved through the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) program in high-speed computer networking research. NanoSonic developed a patented molecular-level self-assembly process to manufacture polymer-based optical fibers in a way similar to the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) approach typically used to make glass optical fibers. Although polymer fiber has a higher attenuation per unit length than glass fiber, short connectorized polymer fiber jumpers offer significant cost savings over their glass counterparts, particularly due to the potential use of low-cost plastic fiber connectors. As part of the SBIR commercialization process, NanoSonic exclusively licensed this technology to a large ($100B+ market cap) U.S.-based manufacturing conglomerate near the end of the first year of the Phase II program. With this base technology developed and licensed, NanoSonic then worked with Polymicro to address secondary program goals of using related but not conflicting production methods to enhance the performance of other specialty optical fiber products andmore » components, and Virginia Tech continued its evaluation of developed polymer fibers in its network infrastructure system on the university campus. We also report our current understanding of the observation during the Phase I program of quantum conductance and partial quantum conductance in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices. Such conductance behavior may be modeled as singlemode behavior in one-dimensional electrically conducting waveguides, similar in principle to singlemode optical propagation in dielectric fiber waveguides. Although NanoSonic has not licensed any of the additional technology developed during the second year of the program, several proprietary discussions with major materials companies are underway as of the conclusion of Phase II.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. NanoSonic Inc., Pembroke, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
NanoSonic Inc., Pembroke, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21)
OSTI Identifier:
1431258
Report Number(s):
DOE-NANOSONIC-11255
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0011255
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; fiber optics; polymer fiber; single mode fiber; self-assembly; high speed communication; graded index fiber

Citation Formats

Claus, Richard Otto. Low Loss Graded Index Polymer Optical Fiber for Local Networking. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1431258.
Claus, Richard Otto. Low Loss Graded Index Polymer Optical Fiber for Local Networking. United States. doi:10.2172/1431258.
Claus, Richard Otto. Thu . "Low Loss Graded Index Polymer Optical Fiber for Local Networking". United States. doi:10.2172/1431258. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1431258.
@article{osti_1431258,
title = {Low Loss Graded Index Polymer Optical Fiber for Local Networking},
author = {Claus, Richard Otto},
abstractNote = {Here, the objective of this Department of Energy SBIR program has been to develop technology for the advancement of advanced computing systems. NanoSonic worked with two subcontractors, the Polymicro Division of Molex, a U.S.-based manufacturer of specialized optical fiber and fiber components, and Virginia Tech, a research university involved through the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) program in high-speed computer networking research. NanoSonic developed a patented molecular-level self-assembly process to manufacture polymer-based optical fibers in a way similar to the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) approach typically used to make glass optical fibers. Although polymer fiber has a higher attenuation per unit length than glass fiber, short connectorized polymer fiber jumpers offer significant cost savings over their glass counterparts, particularly due to the potential use of low-cost plastic fiber connectors. As part of the SBIR commercialization process, NanoSonic exclusively licensed this technology to a large ($100B+ market cap) U.S.-based manufacturing conglomerate near the end of the first year of the Phase II program. With this base technology developed and licensed, NanoSonic then worked with Polymicro to address secondary program goals of using related but not conflicting production methods to enhance the performance of other specialty optical fiber products and components, and Virginia Tech continued its evaluation of developed polymer fibers in its network infrastructure system on the university campus. We also report our current understanding of the observation during the Phase I program of quantum conductance and partial quantum conductance in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices. Such conductance behavior may be modeled as singlemode behavior in one-dimensional electrically conducting waveguides, similar in principle to singlemode optical propagation in dielectric fiber waveguides. Although NanoSonic has not licensed any of the additional technology developed during the second year of the program, several proprietary discussions with major materials companies are underway as of the conclusion of Phase II.},
doi = {10.2172/1431258},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}