skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Evaluating the Impact of Ocean Eddies in the Global Marine Carbon Cycle

Abstract

The ocean plays a crucial role in the Earth’s carbon cycle due to its ability to exchange carbon dioxide (CO2) with the atmosphere, and subsequently store it for long periods of time. Part of this sequestration is due to a mechanism known as the Biological Pump, a process where phytoplankton and autotrophic bacteria convert dissolved CO2 to organic matter via photosynthesis, much of which ends up sinking and can remain in the deep ocean for hundreds or thousands of years. If the strength of the Biological Pump changes due the human-induced increase in atmospheric CO2, it will affect the rate of global warming. Earth System Models (ESMs) are now including ocean biogeochemical processes in order to quantify changes in the global carbon cycle under climate change scenarios by embedding a model that represents ocean chemistry and the dynamics of marine ecosystems within an ocean circulation framework. Due to the increased computational cost of including marine biogeochemistry (BGC), they are typically run with relatively low complexity and coarse horizontal grid resolution. Our project utilizes Institutional Computing power to undertake an ESM simulation using a moderate complexity BGC model (35 constituents) and an increased grid resolution that allows the formation of turbulentmore » mesoscale eddies (30 to 200 km in size) in the ocean. Comparing with low resolution runs will allow us to assess whether standard ESMs are biased in their representation of the carbon cycle due to parameterized effects of sub-grid scale physics.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1431107
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-22853
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Maltrud, Mathew Einar, and Wang, Shanlin. Evaluating the Impact of Ocean Eddies in the Global Marine Carbon Cycle. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1431107.
Maltrud, Mathew Einar, & Wang, Shanlin. Evaluating the Impact of Ocean Eddies in the Global Marine Carbon Cycle. United States. doi:10.2172/1431107.
Maltrud, Mathew Einar, and Wang, Shanlin. Tue . "Evaluating the Impact of Ocean Eddies in the Global Marine Carbon Cycle". United States. doi:10.2172/1431107. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1431107.
@article{osti_1431107,
title = {Evaluating the Impact of Ocean Eddies in the Global Marine Carbon Cycle},
author = {Maltrud, Mathew Einar and Wang, Shanlin},
abstractNote = {The ocean plays a crucial role in the Earth’s carbon cycle due to its ability to exchange carbon dioxide (CO2) with the atmosphere, and subsequently store it for long periods of time. Part of this sequestration is due to a mechanism known as the Biological Pump, a process where phytoplankton and autotrophic bacteria convert dissolved CO2 to organic matter via photosynthesis, much of which ends up sinking and can remain in the deep ocean for hundreds or thousands of years. If the strength of the Biological Pump changes due the human-induced increase in atmospheric CO2, it will affect the rate of global warming. Earth System Models (ESMs) are now including ocean biogeochemical processes in order to quantify changes in the global carbon cycle under climate change scenarios by embedding a model that represents ocean chemistry and the dynamics of marine ecosystems within an ocean circulation framework. Due to the increased computational cost of including marine biogeochemistry (BGC), they are typically run with relatively low complexity and coarse horizontal grid resolution. Our project utilizes Institutional Computing power to undertake an ESM simulation using a moderate complexity BGC model (35 constituents) and an increased grid resolution that allows the formation of turbulent mesoscale eddies (30 to 200 km in size) in the ocean. Comparing with low resolution runs will allow us to assess whether standard ESMs are biased in their representation of the carbon cycle due to parameterized effects of sub-grid scale physics.},
doi = {10.2172/1431107},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: