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Title: Orographic Modification of Precipitation Processes in Hurricane Karl (2010)

Abstract

Airborne radar data collected within Hurricane Karl (2010) provide a high-resolution glimpse of variations in the vertical precipitation structure around complex terrain in eastern Mexico. Widespread precipitation north of Karl’s track traced the strong gradient of terrain, suggesting orographic enhancement. Although the airborne radar did not sample the period of peak precipitation, time series of surface rainfall at three locations near the inner core show greater precipitation where flow was oriented to rise over the terrain. In regions of upslope flow, radar observations reveal reflectivity enhancement within 1–2 km of the surface. The shallow nature of the enhancement points to orographically generated cloud water accreted by falling drops as a mechanism consistent with prior studies, while the heterogeneous nature of the enhancement suggests shallow convection was playing a role. In contrast, regions of downslope flow were characterized by uniform reflectivity above the ground and fallstreaks originating above the melting level. Unlike most previously studied tropical cyclones passing over topography, Karl made landfall on a mountainous continent, not an island. As Karl weakened and decayed over land, the vertical structure of the radar echo deteriorated north of the storm center, and infrared satellite imagery revealed a strong reduction in the upper-levelmore » cloud coverage; however, a small region of intense convection appeared and produced locally heavy rainfall as Karl was close to dissipation. In conclusion, these results indicate that orographic modification processes in a landfalling tropical cyclone are not static, and surface precipitation is highly sensitive to the changes.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences
  2. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1431026
Grant/Contract Number:
NNX15AN52H; NNX12AJ82G; AGS-1503155; AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Monthly Weather Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 145; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-0644
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Tropical cyclones; Orographic effects; Radars/Radar observations; Field experiments

Citation Formats

DeHart, Jennifer C., and Houze, Robert A. Orographic Modification of Precipitation Processes in Hurricane Karl (2010). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/mwr-d-17-0014.1.
DeHart, Jennifer C., & Houze, Robert A. Orographic Modification of Precipitation Processes in Hurricane Karl (2010). United States. doi:10.1175/mwr-d-17-0014.1.
DeHart, Jennifer C., and Houze, Robert A. Fri . "Orographic Modification of Precipitation Processes in Hurricane Karl (2010)". United States. doi:10.1175/mwr-d-17-0014.1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1431026.
@article{osti_1431026,
title = {Orographic Modification of Precipitation Processes in Hurricane Karl (2010)},
author = {DeHart, Jennifer C. and Houze, Robert A.},
abstractNote = {Airborne radar data collected within Hurricane Karl (2010) provide a high-resolution glimpse of variations in the vertical precipitation structure around complex terrain in eastern Mexico. Widespread precipitation north of Karl’s track traced the strong gradient of terrain, suggesting orographic enhancement. Although the airborne radar did not sample the period of peak precipitation, time series of surface rainfall at three locations near the inner core show greater precipitation where flow was oriented to rise over the terrain. In regions of upslope flow, radar observations reveal reflectivity enhancement within 1–2 km of the surface. The shallow nature of the enhancement points to orographically generated cloud water accreted by falling drops as a mechanism consistent with prior studies, while the heterogeneous nature of the enhancement suggests shallow convection was playing a role. In contrast, regions of downslope flow were characterized by uniform reflectivity above the ground and fallstreaks originating above the melting level. Unlike most previously studied tropical cyclones passing over topography, Karl made landfall on a mountainous continent, not an island. As Karl weakened and decayed over land, the vertical structure of the radar echo deteriorated north of the storm center, and infrared satellite imagery revealed a strong reduction in the upper-level cloud coverage; however, a small region of intense convection appeared and produced locally heavy rainfall as Karl was close to dissipation. In conclusion, these results indicate that orographic modification processes in a landfalling tropical cyclone are not static, and surface precipitation is highly sensitive to the changes.},
doi = {10.1175/mwr-d-17-0014.1},
journal = {Monthly Weather Review},
number = 10,
volume = 145,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Oct 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Oct 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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