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Title: Using traits to uncover tropical forest function

Abstract

Plant traits reflect their evolutionary history and influence physiological processes (Reich, 2014). For example, the embolism risk taken by plants, called the embolism safety margin, is a good predictor of stomatal conductance, and hence photosynthesis (Skelton et al., 2015). Trait-science has grown dramatically in the last decade as we have found niversal patterns governing the carbon and nutrient economies of plants (Bloom et al., 1985). Perhaps the greatest value of studying plant functional traits is that they yield understanding of plant functional processes.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA
  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1430443
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-125593
Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
New Phytologist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 214; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Amazon forest function; Earth system models; plant traits; trait-based models; tropical forests

Citation Formats

McDowell, Nate G., and Xu, Chonggang. Using traits to uncover tropical forest function. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/nph.14576.
McDowell, Nate G., & Xu, Chonggang. Using traits to uncover tropical forest function. United States. doi:10.1111/nph.14576.
McDowell, Nate G., and Xu, Chonggang. Tue . "Using traits to uncover tropical forest function". United States. doi:10.1111/nph.14576.
@article{osti_1430443,
title = {Using traits to uncover tropical forest function},
author = {McDowell, Nate G. and Xu, Chonggang},
abstractNote = {Plant traits reflect their evolutionary history and influence physiological processes (Reich, 2014). For example, the embolism risk taken by plants, called the embolism safety margin, is a good predictor of stomatal conductance, and hence photosynthesis (Skelton et al., 2015). Trait-science has grown dramatically in the last decade as we have found niversal patterns governing the carbon and nutrient economies of plants (Bloom et al., 1985). Perhaps the greatest value of studying plant functional traits is that they yield understanding of plant functional processes.},
doi = {10.1111/nph.14576},
journal = {New Phytologist},
issn = {0028-646X},
number = 3,
volume = 214,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {4}
}

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