skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion

Abstract

The heat conductivity of reacting melter feed affects the heat transfer and conversion process in the cold cap (the reacting feed floating on molten glass). To investigate it, we simulated the feed conditions and morphology in the cold-cap by preparing “fast-dried slurry blocks”, formed by rapidly evaporating water from feed slurry poured onto a 200°C surface. A heat conductivity meter was used to measure heat conductivity of samples cut from the fast-dried slurry blocks, samples of a cold cap retrieved from a laboratory-scale melter, and loose dry powder feed samples. Our study indicates that the heat conductivity of the feed in the cold cap is significantly higher than that of loose dry powder feed, resulting from the feed solidification during the water evaporation from the feed slurry. To assess the heat transfer at higher temperatures when feed turns into foam, we developed a theoretical model that predicts the foam heat conductivity based on morphology data from in-situ X-ray computed tomography. The implications for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap are discussed.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Joint Workplace of the University of Chemistry and Technology Prague and the Institute, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics of the ASCR, Prague Czech Republic
  2. Radiological Materials & Detection Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington
  3. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland Washington
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1430436
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-127403
Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7820; 830403000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the American Ceramic Society; Journal Volume: 100; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hujova, Miroslava, Pokorny, Richard, Klouzek, Jaroslav, Dixon, Derek R., Cutforth, Derek A., Lee, Seungmin, McCarthy, Benjamin P., Schweiger, Michael J., Kruger, Albert A., and Hrma, Pavel. Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/jace.15052.
Hujova, Miroslava, Pokorny, Richard, Klouzek, Jaroslav, Dixon, Derek R., Cutforth, Derek A., Lee, Seungmin, McCarthy, Benjamin P., Schweiger, Michael J., Kruger, Albert A., & Hrma, Pavel. Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion. United States. doi:10.1111/jace.15052.
Hujova, Miroslava, Pokorny, Richard, Klouzek, Jaroslav, Dixon, Derek R., Cutforth, Derek A., Lee, Seungmin, McCarthy, Benjamin P., Schweiger, Michael J., Kruger, Albert A., and Hrma, Pavel. Mon . "Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion". United States. doi:10.1111/jace.15052.
@article{osti_1430436,
title = {Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion},
author = {Hujova, Miroslava and Pokorny, Richard and Klouzek, Jaroslav and Dixon, Derek R. and Cutforth, Derek A. and Lee, Seungmin and McCarthy, Benjamin P. and Schweiger, Michael J. and Kruger, Albert A. and Hrma, Pavel},
abstractNote = {The heat conductivity of reacting melter feed affects the heat transfer and conversion process in the cold cap (the reacting feed floating on molten glass). To investigate it, we simulated the feed conditions and morphology in the cold-cap by preparing “fast-dried slurry blocks”, formed by rapidly evaporating water from feed slurry poured onto a 200°C surface. A heat conductivity meter was used to measure heat conductivity of samples cut from the fast-dried slurry blocks, samples of a cold cap retrieved from a laboratory-scale melter, and loose dry powder feed samples. Our study indicates that the heat conductivity of the feed in the cold cap is significantly higher than that of loose dry powder feed, resulting from the feed solidification during the water evaporation from the feed slurry. To assess the heat transfer at higher temperatures when feed turns into foam, we developed a theoretical model that predicts the foam heat conductivity based on morphology data from in-situ X-ray computed tomography. The implications for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap are discussed.},
doi = {10.1111/jace.15052},
journal = {Journal of the American Ceramic Society},
number = 11,
volume = 100,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}