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Title: Lipid transport by TMEM24 at ER–plasma membrane contacts regulates pulsatile insulin secretion

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1430330
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science; Journal Volume: 355; Journal Issue: 6326
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Lees, Joshua A., Messa, Mirko, Sun, Elizabeth Wen, Wheeler, Heather, Torta, Federico, Wenk, Markus R., De Camilli, Pietro, and Reinisch, Karin M.. Lipid transport by TMEM24 at ER–plasma membrane contacts regulates pulsatile insulin secretion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aah6171.
Lees, Joshua A., Messa, Mirko, Sun, Elizabeth Wen, Wheeler, Heather, Torta, Federico, Wenk, Markus R., De Camilli, Pietro, & Reinisch, Karin M.. Lipid transport by TMEM24 at ER–plasma membrane contacts regulates pulsatile insulin secretion. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aah6171.
Lees, Joshua A., Messa, Mirko, Sun, Elizabeth Wen, Wheeler, Heather, Torta, Federico, Wenk, Markus R., De Camilli, Pietro, and Reinisch, Karin M.. Thu . "Lipid transport by TMEM24 at ER–plasma membrane contacts regulates pulsatile insulin secretion". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aah6171.
@article{osti_1430330,
title = {Lipid transport by TMEM24 at ER–plasma membrane contacts regulates pulsatile insulin secretion},
author = {Lees, Joshua A. and Messa, Mirko and Sun, Elizabeth Wen and Wheeler, Heather and Torta, Federico and Wenk, Markus R. and De Camilli, Pietro and Reinisch, Karin M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1126/science.aah6171},
journal = {Science},
number = 6326,
volume = 355,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 16 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 16 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K{sup +}-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K{sup +}-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulatesmore » insulin secretion through regulating Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis.« less
  • We have previously shown that palmitate potentiates, in isolated islets, glucose-induced stimulation of insulin release, de novo lipid synthesis, and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} turnover in a correlative manner. Norepinephrine, a known inhibitor of the secretory response, has now been used to further investigate the relationships among the three phenomena. The amine decreased insulin secretion dose dependently in response to glucose and palmitate with alpha 2-adrenergic specificity. It also reduced similarly the oxidation of 1 mmol/l (U-{sup 14}C)palmitate as well as the incorporation of 20 mmol/l D-(U-{sup 14}C)glucose into islet phospholipids and neutral lipids through an alpha 2-adrenergic mechanism. These resultsmore » indirectly suggest that alpha 2-adrenoceptor stimulation inhibits in islets both palmitate oxidation and esterification through an inactivation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase and other enzymes of glycerolipid synthesis. Islet uptake of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} was also decreased by norepinephrine with a similar sensitivity to that shown by insulin release and de novo lipid synthesis. Therefore, it is suggested that alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated reduction of the potentiation by palmitate of the secretory response to glucose depends on the inhibition of fatty acid metabolism and the resulting impairment of de novo lipid synthesis and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} turnover.« less
  • Research highlights: {yields} ARF1 activation is involved in the EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Assembly of {gamma}-COP coatomer mediates EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking regulates nuclear transport of EGFR. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that cell surface receptors, such as the entire epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, have been shown to localize in the nucleus. A retrograde route from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is postulated to be involved in the EGFR trafficking to the nucleus; however, the molecular mechanism in this proposed model remains unexplored.more » Here, we demonstrate that membrane-embedded vesicular trafficking is involved in the nuclear transport of EGFR. Confocal immunofluorescence reveals that in response to EGF, a portion of EGFR redistributes to the Golgi and the ER, where its NH{sub 2}-terminus resides within the lumen of Golgi/ER and COOH-terminus is exposed to the cytoplasm. Blockage of the Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking by brefeldin A or dominant mutants of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor, which both resulted in the disassembly of the coat protein complex I (COPI) coat to the Golgi, inhibit EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. We further find that EGF-dependent nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER involving an association of EGFR with {gamma}-COP, one of the subunits of the COPI coatomer. Our findings experimentally provide a comprehensive pathway that nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by COPI-mediated vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the ER, and may serve as a general mechanism in regulating the nuclear transport of other cell surface receptors.« less
  • L-Lysine, like-L-arginine, L-ornithine, or L-homoarginine, accumulated in rat pancreatic islets and stimulated /sup 86/Rb efflux, /sup 45/Ca uptake and efflux, and insulin release in islets exposed to D-glucose (7.0 mM). The effect of L-lysine differed from that of the other cationic amino acids by such features as the absence of a threshold concentration for stimulation of insulin release, a much lesser sensitivity of the secretory response to intracellular acidification, and the stimulation of /sup 86/Rb net uptake over 60 min of incubation. This coincided with the fact that even in the absence of another exogenous nutrient, L-lysine was well oxidized,more » augmented NH/sup 4 +/ production, increased both the ATP content and ATP/ADP ratio, caused a time-related decrease in /sup 86/Rb fractional outflow, and provoked either a transient (10 mM L-lysine) or sustained (20 mM L-lysine) stimulation of insulin secretion. It is proposed, therefore, that the functional response of the pancreatic B-cell to L-lysine involves not only a biophysical mechanism similar to that responsible for the insulinotropic action of L-homoarginine, but also a significant, albeit modest, metabolic component, which reflects the capacity of L-lysine to act as a fuel in islet cells.« less
  • To investigate underlying ultradian periodicities in spontaneous circulating GH concentrations, blood samples were drawn from 15 normal short boys every 20 min over a 24-h period, and plasma GH concentrations were measured using an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay. The limit of detection for the GH assay was 0.01 [mu]g/L. The GH time series were analyzed using the Cluster program, Ultra program, cosinor analysis, and autocorrelation analysis. Plasma GH concentrations in 1,095 samples derived from 15 normal short boys were all within the detectable range of the assay and ranged from 0.07-52.2 [mu]g/L. Thirty-six percent of the GH values in the 1,095more » samples from 15 normal short boys were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 82% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. Cluster analysis disclosed a total of 176 peaks in 15 normal short boys, with a mean [+-] SEM number of significant GH peaks of 12.1 [+-] 0.5/24 h. Twelve percent of the 176 peaks were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 95% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. In addition, Cluster analysis disclosed 161 interpulse intervals in total, with a mean [+-] SEM interval of 116.5 [+-] 4.3 min. The GH interpulse interval did not show a significant 24-h rhythm, whereas the GH peak height increased significantly at night. An independent discrete peak detection in program, Ultra, identified 12.6 [+-] 0.5 GH peaks/24 h. This result was in good agreement with that from analysis by the Cluster program (P = NS). Autocorrelation analysis revealed that GH time series were significantly autocorrelated in 9 of the 15 boys, with maximal autocorrelation coefficients at 115.5 min, on the average. The mean autocorrelation coefficient for a group of 15 normal short boys was significantly positive at a 100-min lag. These findings suggest that there could be a regularly occurring periodicity of approximately 100-120 min in the human GH time series. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less