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Title: Vesicular stomatitis virus N protein-specific single-domain antibody fragments inhibit replication

Authors:
; ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NIHFOREIGN
OSTI Identifier:
1430319
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: EMBO Reports; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Hanke, Leo, Schmidt, Florian I., Knockenhauer, Kevin E., Morin, Benjamin, Whelan, Sean PJ, Schwartz, Thomas U., and Ploegh, Hidde L.. Vesicular stomatitis virus N protein-specific single-domain antibody fragments inhibit replication. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.15252/embr.201643764.
Hanke, Leo, Schmidt, Florian I., Knockenhauer, Kevin E., Morin, Benjamin, Whelan, Sean PJ, Schwartz, Thomas U., & Ploegh, Hidde L.. Vesicular stomatitis virus N protein-specific single-domain antibody fragments inhibit replication. United States. doi:10.15252/embr.201643764.
Hanke, Leo, Schmidt, Florian I., Knockenhauer, Kevin E., Morin, Benjamin, Whelan, Sean PJ, Schwartz, Thomas U., and Ploegh, Hidde L.. Mon . "Vesicular stomatitis virus N protein-specific single-domain antibody fragments inhibit replication". United States. doi:10.15252/embr.201643764.
@article{osti_1430319,
title = {Vesicular stomatitis virus N protein-specific single-domain antibody fragments inhibit replication},
author = {Hanke, Leo and Schmidt, Florian I. and Knockenhauer, Kevin E. and Morin, Benjamin and Whelan, Sean PJ and Schwartz, Thomas U. and Ploegh, Hidde L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.15252/embr.201643764},
journal = {EMBO Reports},
number = 6,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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