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Title: Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1430301
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Biological Chemistry; Journal Volume: 292; Journal Issue: 14
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Baytshtok, Vladimir, Chen, Jiejin, Glynn, Steven E., Nager, Andrew R., Grant, Robert A., Baker, Tania A., and Sauer, Robert T.. Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1074/jbc.M116.768978.
Baytshtok, Vladimir, Chen, Jiejin, Glynn, Steven E., Nager, Andrew R., Grant, Robert A., Baker, Tania A., & Sauer, Robert T.. Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation. United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M116.768978.
Baytshtok, Vladimir, Chen, Jiejin, Glynn, Steven E., Nager, Andrew R., Grant, Robert A., Baker, Tania A., and Sauer, Robert T.. Tue . "Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation". United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M116.768978.
@article{osti_1430301,
title = {Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation},
author = {Baytshtok, Vladimir and Chen, Jiejin and Glynn, Steven E. and Nager, Andrew R. and Grant, Robert A. and Baker, Tania A. and Sauer, Robert T.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1074/jbc.M116.768978},
journal = {Journal of Biological Chemistry},
number = 14,
volume = 292,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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