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Title: Final Technical Report for “Multi-scale processes driving tropical convection and influence of the aerosol”, DE-SC0011074

Abstract

This DOE GoAmazon collaborative project between scientists in the US and Brazil addresses fundamental processes that drive tropical deep convection including aerosol effects. The results provide guidance for improving the parameterizations of cloud and aerosol effects by increasing the knowledge of processes at work in tropical convection, especially over tropical land. Highlights include: • GoAmazon2014/5 observations permitted, for the first time, a comprehensive evaluation of the strong relationship between lower free tropospheric moisture and deep convective onset over the Amazon (Schiro et al. 2016, JAS; Schiro et al. 2018b, PNAS; Chakraborty et al. 2018, ACP; Schiro and Neelin 2018c). A set of diagnostics for deep convective onset has been established using data from the GoAmazon2014/5 campaign (Schiro et al. 2016, JAS), highlighting similarities and differences between the convective transition statistics over tropical land versus corresponding statistics from ARM campaigns in the tropical Western Pacific. The initial set of diagnostics has been provided as a module to be incorporated into the ARM Diagnostics Package of Shaocheng Xie and coworkers, which is being integrated into the PCMDI and E3SM diagnostics packages. Additionally, a set of downdraft diagnostics to inform model parameterizations has been developed (Schiro and Neelin 2018a, ACP). • These diagnosticsmore » have been used in constraining the behavior of modeled convective parameterizations. This includes using them with parameter perturbation experiments in the Community Earth System Model to show which parameter ranges are consistent with observed onset statistics, and to show that the primary causal direction of the water vapor-precipitation relationship is via the impact of mixing processes and free tropospheric moisture on convection (Kuo et al. 2017, JAS). Lintner et al. (2017, GRL) used this impact of free tropospheric moisture to systematically analyze issues in the simulation of Amazon rainfall in the CMIP5 model ensemble. • Leveraging the multi-instrument GoAmazon observations, Schiro et al. (2018, PNAS) are able to provide for the first time an empirical mixing using radar wind profiler data that provides a good predictor of precipitation for both mesoscale convective systems and smaller-scale convection. In addition, buoyancy estimated from these results is a good predictor of precipitation across the seasonal and diurnal cycles (Schiro and Neelin 2018c, JAS) and permits the effects of aerosols to be distinguished from those of the thermodynamic environment in the transition to deep convection (Chakraborty et al. 2018, ACP). • Placing the GoAmazon campaign in a larger context, in collaboration with U. São Paulo investigators, Rehbein et al. (2018) analyzed the characteristics of the mesoscale convective systems (MCS) that affect Amazon rainfall, including origins, lifetimes, propagation speed and displacement. de Barros Soares et al. (2017) establish statistically significant observed warming trends over much of South America and are able to attribute the origin of this to anthropogenic forcing based on the agreement of climate model simulations with and without anthropogenic forcings. This analysis left open the attribution of precipitation trends due to large natural variability. Barkhardorian et al. (2018) provide evidence indicating that the observed regional precipitation decrease and drying during recent over northern South America during recent austral springs will continue and intensify in the course of unfolding anthropogenic climate change.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of California, Los Angeles
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
Contributing Org.:
University of São Paulo, Brazil
OSTI Identifier:
1430266
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCLA-SC0011074-1
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0011074
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GoAmazon2014/5 field campaign; deep convection; aerosol effects; convective parameterization; mesoscale convective systems; precipitation-buoyancy relationship; South American temperature and precipitation trends

Citation Formats

Mechoso, Carlos Roberto, and Neelin, J. David. Final Technical Report for “Multi-scale processes driving tropical convection and influence of the aerosol”, DE-SC0011074. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Mechoso, Carlos Roberto, & Neelin, J. David. Final Technical Report for “Multi-scale processes driving tropical convection and influence of the aerosol”, DE-SC0011074. United States.
Mechoso, Carlos Roberto, and Neelin, J. David. Thu . "Final Technical Report for “Multi-scale processes driving tropical convection and influence of the aerosol”, DE-SC0011074". United States.
@article{osti_1430266,
title = {Final Technical Report for “Multi-scale processes driving tropical convection and influence of the aerosol”, DE-SC0011074},
author = {Mechoso, Carlos Roberto and Neelin, J. David},
abstractNote = {This DOE GoAmazon collaborative project between scientists in the US and Brazil addresses fundamental processes that drive tropical deep convection including aerosol effects. The results provide guidance for improving the parameterizations of cloud and aerosol effects by increasing the knowledge of processes at work in tropical convection, especially over tropical land. Highlights include: • GoAmazon2014/5 observations permitted, for the first time, a comprehensive evaluation of the strong relationship between lower free tropospheric moisture and deep convective onset over the Amazon (Schiro et al. 2016, JAS; Schiro et al. 2018b, PNAS; Chakraborty et al. 2018, ACP; Schiro and Neelin 2018c). A set of diagnostics for deep convective onset has been established using data from the GoAmazon2014/5 campaign (Schiro et al. 2016, JAS), highlighting similarities and differences between the convective transition statistics over tropical land versus corresponding statistics from ARM campaigns in the tropical Western Pacific. The initial set of diagnostics has been provided as a module to be incorporated into the ARM Diagnostics Package of Shaocheng Xie and coworkers, which is being integrated into the PCMDI and E3SM diagnostics packages. Additionally, a set of downdraft diagnostics to inform model parameterizations has been developed (Schiro and Neelin 2018a, ACP). • These diagnostics have been used in constraining the behavior of modeled convective parameterizations. This includes using them with parameter perturbation experiments in the Community Earth System Model to show which parameter ranges are consistent with observed onset statistics, and to show that the primary causal direction of the water vapor-precipitation relationship is via the impact of mixing processes and free tropospheric moisture on convection (Kuo et al. 2017, JAS). Lintner et al. (2017, GRL) used this impact of free tropospheric moisture to systematically analyze issues in the simulation of Amazon rainfall in the CMIP5 model ensemble. • Leveraging the multi-instrument GoAmazon observations, Schiro et al. (2018, PNAS) are able to provide for the first time an empirical mixing using radar wind profiler data that provides a good predictor of precipitation for both mesoscale convective systems and smaller-scale convection. In addition, buoyancy estimated from these results is a good predictor of precipitation across the seasonal and diurnal cycles (Schiro and Neelin 2018c, JAS) and permits the effects of aerosols to be distinguished from those of the thermodynamic environment in the transition to deep convection (Chakraborty et al. 2018, ACP). • Placing the GoAmazon campaign in a larger context, in collaboration with U. São Paulo investigators, Rehbein et al. (2018) analyzed the characteristics of the mesoscale convective systems (MCS) that affect Amazon rainfall, including origins, lifetimes, propagation speed and displacement. de Barros Soares et al. (2017) establish statistically significant observed warming trends over much of South America and are able to attribute the origin of this to anthropogenic forcing based on the agreement of climate model simulations with and without anthropogenic forcings. This analysis left open the attribution of precipitation trends due to large natural variability. Barkhardorian et al. (2018) provide evidence indicating that the observed regional precipitation decrease and drying during recent over northern South America during recent austral springs will continue and intensify in the course of unfolding anthropogenic climate change.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Technical Report:
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