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Title: FY 2018 ARM Radar Plan

Abstract

The fundamental objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility radar facility is to provide high-quality radar observations to the scientific user community with an overarching goal of improving the treatment of clouds and precipitation in climate models. Historically, ARM has operated zenith-profiling cloud radars at millimeter wavelengths at five of its facilities. Since 2010, 16 scanning systems have been added to the radar facility. The ARM radar facility has 33 radars in its possession at three fixed sites and three mobile facilities. A breakdown of the ARM radar assets is given below: 8 Scanning ARM Clouds Radar Systems (SACR: two radars on single pedestal; six 1st- and two 2nd- generation) 7 Ka-band ARM Zenith profiling Radar (KAZR: five 1st- and two 2nd-generation) 5 X-band Scanning ARM precipitation Radar (XSAPR: four 1st- and one 2nd-generation) 3 C-band Scanning ARM precipitation Radar (CSAPR: two 1st- and one 2nd-generation) 1 W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) 1 Marine W-band ARM Cloud Radar (MWACR: configured to be deployed on a stable table or scanning pedestal). Of these radars, all but six (two SACRs [accounting for four radars], one KAZR, and one 1st-generation CSAPR) have operational assignments. Therefore,more » the current measurement strategy involves operating 27 radars, not including radar wind profilers (RWPs). This array of instruments represents a combination of scanning and profiling radars at ARM’s sites. In addition to the scanning capabilities, the radars at each site differ in operating frequency, technology, and complexity, but all are complex systems. Some of them were custom designed and built specifically for ARM. Typically, newer systems take a few years to reach operational maturity with adequate characterization, calibration, testing, and quality control. Due to various factors, not all of the radars have achieved an operationally mature status sufficient to provide high-quality data in a research environment. In addition, these radars are often deployed in remote locations and harsh environments to meet science needs. The remoteness of such complex systems is a considerable challenge for continuous operations. Tools needed for a research-level operational radar are not readily available from vendors, and many of the necessary system management tools, both hardware and software, to manage these systems must be developed in-house for such deployments. Based on experience over the past seven years, including conclusions from the first phase of the radar plan, implemented in mid-2016, it is clear that ARM cannot support the operation of all 27 currently deployed radars and expect to provide research-quality data (including higher-order products) with the current resources. Experience from the first phase of the radar plan has provided a better indication than has been available previously of what size radar network is reasonable. A preliminary proposal for what that radar network could look like is provided here. The plan presented here uses the available resources to best support this proposed network.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1429877
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-18-014
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-ACO5-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Southern Great Plains, North Slope of Alaska, Eastern North Atlantic, Tropical Western Pacific, Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar, MOSAIC, CACTI, MARCUS, Data Quality Office, W-band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, X-band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, X-ban Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar, ARM Mobile Facility, C-band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar

Citation Formats

Bharadwaj, Nitin, Lindenmaier, Andrei, Isom, Bradley, Hardin, Joseph, Matthews, Alyssa, and Johnson, Karen. FY 2018 ARM Radar Plan. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Bharadwaj, Nitin, Lindenmaier, Andrei, Isom, Bradley, Hardin, Joseph, Matthews, Alyssa, & Johnson, Karen. FY 2018 ARM Radar Plan. United States.
Bharadwaj, Nitin, Lindenmaier, Andrei, Isom, Bradley, Hardin, Joseph, Matthews, Alyssa, and Johnson, Karen. Tue . "FY 2018 ARM Radar Plan". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1429877.
@article{osti_1429877,
title = {FY 2018 ARM Radar Plan},
author = {Bharadwaj, Nitin and Lindenmaier, Andrei and Isom, Bradley and Hardin, Joseph and Matthews, Alyssa and Johnson, Karen},
abstractNote = {The fundamental objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility radar facility is to provide high-quality radar observations to the scientific user community with an overarching goal of improving the treatment of clouds and precipitation in climate models. Historically, ARM has operated zenith-profiling cloud radars at millimeter wavelengths at five of its facilities. Since 2010, 16 scanning systems have been added to the radar facility. The ARM radar facility has 33 radars in its possession at three fixed sites and three mobile facilities. A breakdown of the ARM radar assets is given below: 8 Scanning ARM Clouds Radar Systems (SACR: two radars on single pedestal; six 1st- and two 2nd- generation) 7 Ka-band ARM Zenith profiling Radar (KAZR: five 1st- and two 2nd-generation) 5 X-band Scanning ARM precipitation Radar (XSAPR: four 1st- and one 2nd-generation) 3 C-band Scanning ARM precipitation Radar (CSAPR: two 1st- and one 2nd-generation) 1 W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) 1 Marine W-band ARM Cloud Radar (MWACR: configured to be deployed on a stable table or scanning pedestal). Of these radars, all but six (two SACRs [accounting for four radars], one KAZR, and one 1st-generation CSAPR) have operational assignments. Therefore, the current measurement strategy involves operating 27 radars, not including radar wind profilers (RWPs). This array of instruments represents a combination of scanning and profiling radars at ARM’s sites. In addition to the scanning capabilities, the radars at each site differ in operating frequency, technology, and complexity, but all are complex systems. Some of them were custom designed and built specifically for ARM. Typically, newer systems take a few years to reach operational maturity with adequate characterization, calibration, testing, and quality control. Due to various factors, not all of the radars have achieved an operationally mature status sufficient to provide high-quality data in a research environment. In addition, these radars are often deployed in remote locations and harsh environments to meet science needs. The remoteness of such complex systems is a considerable challenge for continuous operations. Tools needed for a research-level operational radar are not readily available from vendors, and many of the necessary system management tools, both hardware and software, to manage these systems must be developed in-house for such deployments. Based on experience over the past seven years, including conclusions from the first phase of the radar plan, implemented in mid-2016, it is clear that ARM cannot support the operation of all 27 currently deployed radars and expect to provide research-quality data (including higher-order products) with the current resources. Experience from the first phase of the radar plan has provided a better indication than has been available previously of what size radar network is reasonable. A preliminary proposal for what that radar network could look like is provided here. The plan presented here uses the available resources to best support this proposed network.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

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