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Title: Modeling and control of fuel distribution in a dual-fuel internal combustion engine leveraging late intake valve closings

Abstract

Advanced internal combustion engines, although generally more efficient than conventional combustion engines, often encounter limitations in multi-cylinder applications due to variations in the combustion process encountered across cylinders and between cycles. This study leverages experimental data from an inline 6-cylinder heavy-duty dual fuel engine equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), a variable geometry turbocharger, and a fully-flexible variable intake valve actuation system to study cylinder-to-cylinder variations in power production and the underlying uneven fuel distribution that causes these variations. The engine is operated with late intake valve closure timings in a dual-fuel combustion mode in which a high reactivity fuel is directly injected into the cylinders and a low reactivity fuel is port injected into the cylinders. Both dual fuel implementation and late intake valve closing (IVC) timings have been shown to improve thermal efficiency. However, experimental data from this study reveal that when late IVC timings are used on a multi-cylinder dual fuel engine a significant variation in IMEP across cylinders results and as such, leads to efficiency losses. The difference in IMEP between the different cylinders ranges from 9% at an IVC of 570°ATDC to 38% at an IVC of 610°ATDC and indicates an increasingly uneven fuel distribution.more » These experimental observations along with engine simulation models developed using GT-Power have been used to better understand the distribution of the port injected fuel across cylinders under various operating conditions on such dual fuel engines. This study revealed that the fuel distribution across cylinders in this dual fuel application is significantly affected by changes in the effective compression ratio as determined by the intake valve close timing as well as the design of the intake system (specifically the length of the intake runners). Late intake valve closures allow a portion of the trapped air and port injected fuel to flow back out of the cylinders into the intake manifold. The fuel that is pushed back in the intake manifold is then unevenly redistributed across the cylinders largely due to the dominating direction of the flow in the intake manifold. The effects of IVC as well as the impact of intake runner length on fuel distribution were quantitatively analyzed and a model was developed that can be used to accurately predict the fuel distribution of the port injected fuel at different operating conditions with an average estimation error of 1.5% in cylinder-specific fuel flow.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, USA
  2. Fuels, Engine and Aftertreatment Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) - Office of Vehicle Technology
OSTI Identifier:
1429855
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Engine Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1468-0874
Publisher:
SAGE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
cylinder-to-cylinder variations; dual fuel engine; fuel distribution

Citation Formats

Kassa, Mateos, Hall, Carrie, Ickes, Andrew, and Wallner, Thomas. Modeling and control of fuel distribution in a dual-fuel internal combustion engine leveraging late intake valve closings. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1177/1468087416674426.
Kassa, Mateos, Hall, Carrie, Ickes, Andrew, & Wallner, Thomas. Modeling and control of fuel distribution in a dual-fuel internal combustion engine leveraging late intake valve closings. United States. doi:10.1177/1468087416674426.
Kassa, Mateos, Hall, Carrie, Ickes, Andrew, and Wallner, Thomas. Fri . "Modeling and control of fuel distribution in a dual-fuel internal combustion engine leveraging late intake valve closings". United States. doi:10.1177/1468087416674426.
@article{osti_1429855,
title = {Modeling and control of fuel distribution in a dual-fuel internal combustion engine leveraging late intake valve closings},
author = {Kassa, Mateos and Hall, Carrie and Ickes, Andrew and Wallner, Thomas},
abstractNote = {Advanced internal combustion engines, although generally more efficient than conventional combustion engines, often encounter limitations in multi-cylinder applications due to variations in the combustion process encountered across cylinders and between cycles. This study leverages experimental data from an inline 6-cylinder heavy-duty dual fuel engine equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), a variable geometry turbocharger, and a fully-flexible variable intake valve actuation system to study cylinder-to-cylinder variations in power production and the underlying uneven fuel distribution that causes these variations. The engine is operated with late intake valve closure timings in a dual-fuel combustion mode in which a high reactivity fuel is directly injected into the cylinders and a low reactivity fuel is port injected into the cylinders. Both dual fuel implementation and late intake valve closing (IVC) timings have been shown to improve thermal efficiency. However, experimental data from this study reveal that when late IVC timings are used on a multi-cylinder dual fuel engine a significant variation in IMEP across cylinders results and as such, leads to efficiency losses. The difference in IMEP between the different cylinders ranges from 9% at an IVC of 570°ATDC to 38% at an IVC of 610°ATDC and indicates an increasingly uneven fuel distribution. These experimental observations along with engine simulation models developed using GT-Power have been used to better understand the distribution of the port injected fuel across cylinders under various operating conditions on such dual fuel engines. This study revealed that the fuel distribution across cylinders in this dual fuel application is significantly affected by changes in the effective compression ratio as determined by the intake valve close timing as well as the design of the intake system (specifically the length of the intake runners). Late intake valve closures allow a portion of the trapped air and port injected fuel to flow back out of the cylinders into the intake manifold. The fuel that is pushed back in the intake manifold is then unevenly redistributed across the cylinders largely due to the dominating direction of the flow in the intake manifold. The effects of IVC as well as the impact of intake runner length on fuel distribution were quantitatively analyzed and a model was developed that can be used to accurately predict the fuel distribution of the port injected fuel at different operating conditions with an average estimation error of 1.5% in cylinder-specific fuel flow.},
doi = {10.1177/1468087416674426},
journal = {International Journal of Engine Research},
issn = {1468-0874},
number = 8,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}

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