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Title: Application of a hybrid multiscale approach to simulate hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the river-groundwater interaction zone.

Abstract

The groundwater-surface water interaction zone (GSIZ) plays an important role in riverine and watershed ecosystems as the exchange of waters of variable composition and temperature (hydrologic exchange flows) stimulate microbial activity and associated biogeochemical reactions. Variable temporal and spatial scales of hydrologic exchange flows, heterogeneity of the subsurface environment, and complexity of biogeochemical reaction networks in the GSIZ present challenges to incorporation of fundamental process representations and model parameterization across a range of spatial scales (e.g. from pore-scale to field scale). This paper presents a novel hybrid multiscale simulation approach that couples hydrologic-biogeochemical (HBGC) processes between two distinct length scales of interest.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1429750
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-2879J
651806
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Hammond, Glenn Edward, Yang, Xiaofan, Song, Xuehang, Song, Hyun-Seob, Hou, Zhangshuan, Chen, Xingyuan, Liu, Yuanyuan, and Scheibe, Tim. Application of a hybrid multiscale approach to simulate hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the river-groundwater interaction zone.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hammond, Glenn Edward, Yang, Xiaofan, Song, Xuehang, Song, Hyun-Seob, Hou, Zhangshuan, Chen, Xingyuan, Liu, Yuanyuan, & Scheibe, Tim. Application of a hybrid multiscale approach to simulate hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the river-groundwater interaction zone.. United States.
Hammond, Glenn Edward, Yang, Xiaofan, Song, Xuehang, Song, Hyun-Seob, Hou, Zhangshuan, Chen, Xingyuan, Liu, Yuanyuan, and Scheibe, Tim. Wed . "Application of a hybrid multiscale approach to simulate hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the river-groundwater interaction zone.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1429750.
@article{osti_1429750,
title = {Application of a hybrid multiscale approach to simulate hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the river-groundwater interaction zone.},
author = {Hammond, Glenn Edward and Yang, Xiaofan and Song, Xuehang and Song, Hyun-Seob and Hou, Zhangshuan and Chen, Xingyuan and Liu, Yuanyuan and Scheibe, Tim},
abstractNote = {The groundwater-surface water interaction zone (GSIZ) plays an important role in riverine and watershed ecosystems as the exchange of waters of variable composition and temperature (hydrologic exchange flows) stimulate microbial activity and associated biogeochemical reactions. Variable temporal and spatial scales of hydrologic exchange flows, heterogeneity of the subsurface environment, and complexity of biogeochemical reaction networks in the GSIZ present challenges to incorporation of fundamental process representations and model parameterization across a range of spatial scales (e.g. from pore-scale to field scale). This paper presents a novel hybrid multiscale simulation approach that couples hydrologic-biogeochemical (HBGC) processes between two distinct length scales of interest.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Program Document:
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