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Title: SBIR Phase I Final Report

Abstract

This program addressed the need for a cost effective, industrially viable, and environmentally benign process to coat Neutrino Focusing Horns to prevent erosion, corrosion, and fatigue of these devices during operation. Neutrino Focusing Horns are commonly made of aluminum with an electroless nickel coating. The process used to apply this coating directly to aluminum is costly due to the environmental and industrial risk associated with the surface pretreatment and application, while being further complicated by the large size of the horn (4 m x 1 m x 1 m) at very low part volumes, limiting the commercial vendor market for applying such a coating. The conventional process used to apply electroless nickel to aluminum consists of 16 chemical processing steps to etch the surface (hydrofluoric acid-based), desmut the surface (chromic acid based), zincate the surface, and apply the coating. In this Phase I SBIR activity we are developing an approach to directly apply nickel or nickel alloys to aluminum using only 5 process steps and environmentally benign chemistries, at existing industrial plating and finishing shops that could accommodate full-size horns, such that the operational lifetimes of Neutrino Focusing Horns can be extended. In Phase I we studied the potential ofmore » a cost effective, industrially scalable, non-contact, and environmentally benign FARADAYIC® Process that consists of a sequential FARADAYIC® ElectroChemical Pretreatment and FARADAYIC® ElectroDeposition approaches to prepare aluminum alloy surfaces for direct electrodeposition of nickel, by: 1) utilizing pulse reverse electric fields combined with an environmentally benign electrolyte to prepare a functionalized, smut free aluminum surface for subsequent electrodeposition of Ni, 2) directly electrodepositing nickel onto aluminum at specified thicknesses, 3) evaluating the coatings performance via the matrix identified by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 4) comparing the corrosion resistance, hardness, and adhesion to conventional electroless nickel coatings, 5) establishing a significantly safer process flow stream, and 6) comparing the anticipated cost of these systems. In Phase I we demonstrated: 1) a one-step non-contact, environmentally benign, electrochemical pretreatment process to prepare the Al surface for plating; reducing the number of surface pretreatment steps from 12 to 1 + rinsing; 2) the ability to directly apply nickel via electrodeposition to Al with good uniformity, adhesion, hardness, and corrosion resistance when compared to electroless nickel based coatings, with one less process step, 3) process scalability to the internal and external diameters of cylinders, and 4) the potential for at least a 50% cost saving when compared conventional electroless nickel on a prototype component with significantly larger cost savings anticipated for full size horns. It is envisioned that this approach (with additional development) can be utilized to enable direct implementation within existing large plating and finishing facilities and can enable a range of alloy coatings to be directly applied to aluminum. Therefore, in Phase II we intend on optimizing and scaling the FARADAYIC® Process to improve coating performance while also demonstrating the potential to prepare full Neutrino Focusing Horns with the help of our TPOC, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and commercial partners. We believe this approach could be widely adopted by the plating and finishing communities due to the industrial need for high value coatings on Al and Al alloys.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Faraday Technology, Inc., Clayton, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Faraday Technology, Inc., Clayton, OH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1429387
Report Number(s):
DOE-FTI-17751
Faraday-2131/FinalReport
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0017751
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; Aluminum; Corrosion Resistance; Neutrino Horns; ElectroDeposition; Nickel Deposition; Coatings; Manufacturing

Citation Formats

Xu, Jing, Inman, Maria, Hall, Timothy, and Taylor, E. Jennings. SBIR Phase I Final Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Xu, Jing, Inman, Maria, Hall, Timothy, & Taylor, E. Jennings. SBIR Phase I Final Report. United States.
Xu, Jing, Inman, Maria, Hall, Timothy, and Taylor, E. Jennings. Mon . "SBIR Phase I Final Report". United States.
@article{osti_1429387,
title = {SBIR Phase I Final Report},
author = {Xu, Jing and Inman, Maria and Hall, Timothy and Taylor, E. Jennings},
abstractNote = {This program addressed the need for a cost effective, industrially viable, and environmentally benign process to coat Neutrino Focusing Horns to prevent erosion, corrosion, and fatigue of these devices during operation. Neutrino Focusing Horns are commonly made of aluminum with an electroless nickel coating. The process used to apply this coating directly to aluminum is costly due to the environmental and industrial risk associated with the surface pretreatment and application, while being further complicated by the large size of the horn (4 m x 1 m x 1 m) at very low part volumes, limiting the commercial vendor market for applying such a coating. The conventional process used to apply electroless nickel to aluminum consists of 16 chemical processing steps to etch the surface (hydrofluoric acid-based), desmut the surface (chromic acid based), zincate the surface, and apply the coating. In this Phase I SBIR activity we are developing an approach to directly apply nickel or nickel alloys to aluminum using only 5 process steps and environmentally benign chemistries, at existing industrial plating and finishing shops that could accommodate full-size horns, such that the operational lifetimes of Neutrino Focusing Horns can be extended. In Phase I we studied the potential of a cost effective, industrially scalable, non-contact, and environmentally benign FARADAYIC® Process that consists of a sequential FARADAYIC® ElectroChemical Pretreatment and FARADAYIC® ElectroDeposition approaches to prepare aluminum alloy surfaces for direct electrodeposition of nickel, by: 1) utilizing pulse reverse electric fields combined with an environmentally benign electrolyte to prepare a functionalized, smut free aluminum surface for subsequent electrodeposition of Ni, 2) directly electrodepositing nickel onto aluminum at specified thicknesses, 3) evaluating the coatings performance via the matrix identified by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 4) comparing the corrosion resistance, hardness, and adhesion to conventional electroless nickel coatings, 5) establishing a significantly safer process flow stream, and 6) comparing the anticipated cost of these systems. In Phase I we demonstrated: 1) a one-step non-contact, environmentally benign, electrochemical pretreatment process to prepare the Al surface for plating; reducing the number of surface pretreatment steps from 12 to 1 + rinsing; 2) the ability to directly apply nickel via electrodeposition to Al with good uniformity, adhesion, hardness, and corrosion resistance when compared to electroless nickel based coatings, with one less process step, 3) process scalability to the internal and external diameters of cylinders, and 4) the potential for at least a 50% cost saving when compared conventional electroless nickel on a prototype component with significantly larger cost savings anticipated for full size horns. It is envisioned that this approach (with additional development) can be utilized to enable direct implementation within existing large plating and finishing facilities and can enable a range of alloy coatings to be directly applied to aluminum. Therefore, in Phase II we intend on optimizing and scaling the FARADAYIC® Process to improve coating performance while also demonstrating the potential to prepare full Neutrino Focusing Horns with the help of our TPOC, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and commercial partners. We believe this approach could be widely adopted by the plating and finishing communities due to the industrial need for high value coatings on Al and Al alloys.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as March 26, 2022
Other availability
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