skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Final report for Assembling Microorganisms into Energy Converting Materials

Abstract

The goal of this project was to integrate microorganisms capable of reversible energy transduction in response to changing relative humidity with non-biological materials to create hybrid energy conversion systems. While plants and many other biological organisms have developed structures that are extraordinarily effective in converting changes in relative humidity into mechanical energy, engineered energy transduction systems rarely take advantage of this powerful phenomenon. Rather than developing synthetic materials that can convert changes in relative humidity in to mechanical energy, we developed approaches to assemble bacterial spores into larger materials. These materials can convert energy from evaporation of water in dry atmospheric conditions, which we demonstrated by building energy harvesters from these materials. We have also developed experiments to investigate the interaction of water with the spore material, and to determine how this interaction imposes limits on energy conversion. In addition, we carried out theoretical calculations to investigate the limits imposed by the environmental conditions to the power available in the energy harvesting process. These calculations took into account heat and water vapor transfer in the atmosphere surrounding the spore based materials. Overall, our results suggest that biomolecular materials are promising candidates to convert energy from evaporation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1429283
Report Number(s):
DOE-COLUMBIA-07999
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0007999
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Spore; Evaporation; Energy; Power; Bacteria; Self-Assembly; Confinement; Kinetics

Citation Formats

Sahin, Ozgur. Final report for Assembling Microorganisms into Energy Converting Materials. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1429283.
Sahin, Ozgur. Final report for Assembling Microorganisms into Energy Converting Materials. United States. doi:10.2172/1429283.
Sahin, Ozgur. Mon . "Final report for Assembling Microorganisms into Energy Converting Materials". United States. doi:10.2172/1429283. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1429283.
@article{osti_1429283,
title = {Final report for Assembling Microorganisms into Energy Converting Materials},
author = {Sahin, Ozgur},
abstractNote = {The goal of this project was to integrate microorganisms capable of reversible energy transduction in response to changing relative humidity with non-biological materials to create hybrid energy conversion systems. While plants and many other biological organisms have developed structures that are extraordinarily effective in converting changes in relative humidity into mechanical energy, engineered energy transduction systems rarely take advantage of this powerful phenomenon. Rather than developing synthetic materials that can convert changes in relative humidity in to mechanical energy, we developed approaches to assemble bacterial spores into larger materials. These materials can convert energy from evaporation of water in dry atmospheric conditions, which we demonstrated by building energy harvesters from these materials. We have also developed experiments to investigate the interaction of water with the spore material, and to determine how this interaction imposes limits on energy conversion. In addition, we carried out theoretical calculations to investigate the limits imposed by the environmental conditions to the power available in the energy harvesting process. These calculations took into account heat and water vapor transfer in the atmosphere surrounding the spore based materials. Overall, our results suggest that biomolecular materials are promising candidates to convert energy from evaporation.},
doi = {10.2172/1429283},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}