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Title: Rare Earth Element Mass Analyzer

Abstract

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking instrumentation to aid in the detection and isolation of rare earth elements (REEs) from coal and coal by-products. To address this need, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposed and, in Phase I, demonstrated the feasibility of a novel Rare Earth Element Mass Analyzer (REEMA) that is capable of laser ablating materials of interest and providing chemical analysis in a compact field portable device. Specifically, we demonstrated the feasibility through positive identification of single atomic ions by laser ablation at a sample site and transport through a custom vacuum system for use in a mass spectrometer device. As a result, we envision REEMA to enable the needed portable field application of REEs detection as they are important in manufacturing high-tech products such as electronics, chemical catalysts, ceramic materials, high strength alloys, and advanced detectors. Currently, laboratory analysis is used to provide the highest quality data possible; however, the measurements are costly to obtain and require intensive sample preparation and analysis time. REEMA will eliminate the limitation and is sought for on-site field and in-process REE identification over a wide range of concentrations.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Physical Optics Corp., Torrance, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Physical Optics Corp., Torrance, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1429114
Report Number(s):
DOE-POC-0017737
10104
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0017737
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; rare earth element; mass spectrometry; desorption; ionization; laser ablation

Citation Formats

Rasool, Haider. Rare Earth Element Mass Analyzer. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Rasool, Haider. Rare Earth Element Mass Analyzer. United States.
Rasool, Haider. Fri . "Rare Earth Element Mass Analyzer". United States.
@article{osti_1429114,
title = {Rare Earth Element Mass Analyzer},
author = {Rasool, Haider},
abstractNote = {The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking instrumentation to aid in the detection and isolation of rare earth elements (REEs) from coal and coal by-products. To address this need, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposed and, in Phase I, demonstrated the feasibility of a novel Rare Earth Element Mass Analyzer (REEMA) that is capable of laser ablating materials of interest and providing chemical analysis in a compact field portable device. Specifically, we demonstrated the feasibility through positive identification of single atomic ions by laser ablation at a sample site and transport through a custom vacuum system for use in a mass spectrometer device. As a result, we envision REEMA to enable the needed portable field application of REEs detection as they are important in manufacturing high-tech products such as electronics, chemical catalysts, ceramic materials, high strength alloys, and advanced detectors. Currently, laboratory analysis is used to provide the highest quality data possible; however, the measurements are costly to obtain and require intensive sample preparation and analysis time. REEMA will eliminate the limitation and is sought for on-site field and in-process REE identification over a wide range of concentrations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as March 23, 2022
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

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