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Title: Pyramiding genes and alleles for improving energy cane biomass yield- Final Report

Abstract

The overall goal of this project is to identify genes and gene interaction networks contributed to the extreme segregants with 30 folds biomass yield difference in sugarcane F2 populations. Towards achieving this goal, yield trials of 108 F2 extreme segregants from S. officinarum LA Purple and S. robustum MOL5829 (LM population) were carried out in two locations in three years. A yield trial of the second F2 population from S. officinarum LA Purple and S. spontaneum US56-14-4 (LU population) was installed in the summer of 2014 and the first set of yield component data was collected. For genotyping, transcriptomes from leaves and stalks of 70 extreme segregants of the LM F2 population and 119 individuals of the LU F2 populations were sequenced. The genomes of 91 F1 individuals from the LM populations are being sequenced to construct ultra-high density genetic maps for each of the two parents for both assisting the LA Purple genome assembling and for testing a hypothesis of female restitution. The genomes of 110 F2 individuals from single F1 in the LU population, a different set from the 119 F2 individuals used for transcriptome sequencing, are being sequenced for mapping genes and QTLs affecting biomass yield andmore » for testing a hypothesis of female restitution. Gene expression analysis between extreme segregants of high and low biomass yield showed up-regulation of cellulose synthase, cellulose, and xylan synthase in high biomass yield segregants among 3,274 genes differentially expressed between the two extremes. Our transcriptome results revealed not only the increment of cell wall biosynthesis pathway is essential, but the rapid turnover of certain cell wall polymers as well as carbohydrate partitioning are also important for recycling and energy conservation during rapid cell growth in high biomass sugarcane. Seventeen differentially expressed genes in auxin, one in ethylene and one in gibberellin related signaling and biosynthesis pathways were identified, which could potentially regulate biomass yield. Differentially expressed genes, PIF3 and EIL5, involved in gibberellin and ethylene pathway could play an important role in biomass accumulation. Differential gene expression analysis was also carried out on the LU population. High-biomass yield was mainly determined by assimilation of carbon in source tissues. The high-level expression of fermentative genes in the low-biomass group was likely induced by their low-energy status. The haploid (tetraploid) genome of S. spontanium AP85-441 was sequenced with chromosome level assembly and allele defined annotation. This reference genome along with the upcoming S. officinarum genome will allow us to identify genes and alleles contributed to biomass yield.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
  2. Hawaii Agriculture Research Center, Kunia, HI (United States)
  3. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Texas A & M AgriLife Research
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1429089
Report Number(s):
DE-SC0010686
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0010686
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Energy cane; extreme segregants; gene expression profiling; genomics; sugarcane

Citation Formats

Ming, Ray, Nagai, Chifumi, and Yu, Qingyi. Pyramiding genes and alleles for improving energy cane biomass yield- Final Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1429089.
Ming, Ray, Nagai, Chifumi, & Yu, Qingyi. Pyramiding genes and alleles for improving energy cane biomass yield- Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1429089.
Ming, Ray, Nagai, Chifumi, and Yu, Qingyi. Thu . "Pyramiding genes and alleles for improving energy cane biomass yield- Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1429089. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1429089.
@article{osti_1429089,
title = {Pyramiding genes and alleles for improving energy cane biomass yield- Final Report},
author = {Ming, Ray and Nagai, Chifumi and Yu, Qingyi},
abstractNote = {The overall goal of this project is to identify genes and gene interaction networks contributed to the extreme segregants with 30 folds biomass yield difference in sugarcane F2 populations. Towards achieving this goal, yield trials of 108 F2 extreme segregants from S. officinarum LA Purple and S. robustum MOL5829 (LM population) were carried out in two locations in three years. A yield trial of the second F2 population from S. officinarum LA Purple and S. spontaneum US56-14-4 (LU population) was installed in the summer of 2014 and the first set of yield component data was collected. For genotyping, transcriptomes from leaves and stalks of 70 extreme segregants of the LM F2 population and 119 individuals of the LU F2 populations were sequenced. The genomes of 91 F1 individuals from the LM populations are being sequenced to construct ultra-high density genetic maps for each of the two parents for both assisting the LA Purple genome assembling and for testing a hypothesis of female restitution. The genomes of 110 F2 individuals from single F1 in the LU population, a different set from the 119 F2 individuals used for transcriptome sequencing, are being sequenced for mapping genes and QTLs affecting biomass yield and for testing a hypothesis of female restitution. Gene expression analysis between extreme segregants of high and low biomass yield showed up-regulation of cellulose synthase, cellulose, and xylan synthase in high biomass yield segregants among 3,274 genes differentially expressed between the two extremes. Our transcriptome results revealed not only the increment of cell wall biosynthesis pathway is essential, but the rapid turnover of certain cell wall polymers as well as carbohydrate partitioning are also important for recycling and energy conservation during rapid cell growth in high biomass sugarcane. Seventeen differentially expressed genes in auxin, one in ethylene and one in gibberellin related signaling and biosynthesis pathways were identified, which could potentially regulate biomass yield. Differentially expressed genes, PIF3 and EIL5, involved in gibberellin and ethylene pathway could play an important role in biomass accumulation. Differential gene expression analysis was also carried out on the LU population. High-biomass yield was mainly determined by assimilation of carbon in source tissues. The high-level expression of fermentative genes in the low-biomass group was likely induced by their low-energy status. The haploid (tetraploid) genome of S. spontanium AP85-441 was sequenced with chromosome level assembly and allele defined annotation. This reference genome along with the upcoming S. officinarum genome will allow us to identify genes and alleles contributed to biomass yield.},
doi = {10.2172/1429089},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Thu Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

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