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Title: Chamber science and technology key question No.1: liquid walls in MFE and IFE

Abstract

For some time now people have thought of liquid walls as an attractive solution to the technology problems of high power density plasma configurations for MFE, and as (nearly) essential for the pulsed wall-loading conditions in IFE. A flowing, renewable surface could be eroded, evaporated and even be broken apart with no permanent adverse effects on a structure requiring frequent maintenance and replacement. Alpha particle energy could be removed without conduction through a solid wall and the associated thermal stress and creep failure modes, and the energy could be extracted at high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. If a liquid wall of sufficient depth could be formed, radiation damage and waste disposal issues for solid structures could be significantly ameliorated. All these benefits are indeed possible, if only liquid walls could be made to work. As we will see, there are many issues associated with the successful and attractive implementation of liquid walls.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
14285
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-135738; AT5015032
AT5015032; TRN: US0110989
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1999 Fusion Summer Study, Snowmass, CO (US), 07/12/1999--07/23/1999; Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; INERTIAL CONFINEMENT; MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT; FIRST WALL; LIQUID METALS; MAINTENANCE; WALL LOADING; THERMAL STRESSES

Citation Formats

Moir, R, and Morley, N. Chamber science and technology key question No.1: liquid walls in MFE and IFE. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Moir, R, & Morley, N. Chamber science and technology key question No.1: liquid walls in MFE and IFE. United States.
Moir, R, and Morley, N. Wed . "Chamber science and technology key question No.1: liquid walls in MFE and IFE". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/14285.
@article{osti_14285,
title = {Chamber science and technology key question No.1: liquid walls in MFE and IFE},
author = {Moir, R and Morley, N},
abstractNote = {For some time now people have thought of liquid walls as an attractive solution to the technology problems of high power density plasma configurations for MFE, and as (nearly) essential for the pulsed wall-loading conditions in IFE. A flowing, renewable surface could be eroded, evaporated and even be broken apart with no permanent adverse effects on a structure requiring frequent maintenance and replacement. Alpha particle energy could be removed without conduction through a solid wall and the associated thermal stress and creep failure modes, and the energy could be extracted at high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. If a liquid wall of sufficient depth could be formed, radiation damage and waste disposal issues for solid structures could be significantly ameliorated. All these benefits are indeed possible, if only liquid walls could be made to work. As we will see, there are many issues associated with the successful and attractive implementation of liquid walls.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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