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Title: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their hydroxylated and methoxylated derivatives in seafood obtained from Puget Sound, WA

Abstract

Synthetic polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants and known to occur in most food items. Consumer fish products have been identified as having some of the highest PBDE levels found in USA food sources. Natural formation of hydroxylated (OH-) and methoxylated (MeO-) PBDEs are also known to occur in simple marine organisms, which may be bioaccumulated by seafood. In this study, we report findings of an initial survey of PBDE, OH-PBDE and MeO-PBDE content in common seafood items available to residents living in the Puget Sound region of Washington State. Seafood samples were either purchased from local grocery stores or caught off the coast of SE Alaska and in Puget Sound. The edible portions of the seafood were analyzed, which for finfish was white muscle (skinless fillets) and for shellfish, either the entire soft tissue (bivalves) or processed meat (calamari, shrimp and scallops). Results indicated that finfish typically had higher levels of PBDEs compared to shellfish with BDE-47 and BDE-99 as the most common congeners detected. Among shellfish, bivalves (clams and mussels) were notable for having much higher levels of OH- and MeO-PBDEs compared to other types of seafood with 6'-OH-BDE-47 and 2'-MeO-BDE-68 being the more common OH-more » and MeO- congeners, respectively. Based on our results and recent updates to daily fish consumption rates, estimated intake rates for Washington State residents will be between 34 and 644 ng PBDEs/day, depending on species consumed. For the OH- and MeO- forms, daily exposure is much more variable but typically would range between 15 and 90 ng/day for most seafood types. If shellfish are primarily consumed, OH-PBDE intake could be as high as 350 ng/day. These daily intake rates for PBDEs are higher than most dietary intake rates calculated for populations in other world regions.« less

Authors:
; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1427896
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-132941
Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697; 400480000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science of the Total Environment; Journal Volume: 630; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cade, Sara E., Kuo, Li-Jung, and Schultz, Irvin R. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their hydroxylated and methoxylated derivatives in seafood obtained from Puget Sound, WA. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.301.
Cade, Sara E., Kuo, Li-Jung, & Schultz, Irvin R. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their hydroxylated and methoxylated derivatives in seafood obtained from Puget Sound, WA. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.301.
Cade, Sara E., Kuo, Li-Jung, and Schultz, Irvin R. Wed . "Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their hydroxylated and methoxylated derivatives in seafood obtained from Puget Sound, WA". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.301.
@article{osti_1427896,
title = {Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their hydroxylated and methoxylated derivatives in seafood obtained from Puget Sound, WA},
author = {Cade, Sara E. and Kuo, Li-Jung and Schultz, Irvin R.},
abstractNote = {Synthetic polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants and known to occur in most food items. Consumer fish products have been identified as having some of the highest PBDE levels found in USA food sources. Natural formation of hydroxylated (OH-) and methoxylated (MeO-) PBDEs are also known to occur in simple marine organisms, which may be bioaccumulated by seafood. In this study, we report findings of an initial survey of PBDE, OH-PBDE and MeO-PBDE content in common seafood items available to residents living in the Puget Sound region of Washington State. Seafood samples were either purchased from local grocery stores or caught off the coast of SE Alaska and in Puget Sound. The edible portions of the seafood were analyzed, which for finfish was white muscle (skinless fillets) and for shellfish, either the entire soft tissue (bivalves) or processed meat (calamari, shrimp and scallops). Results indicated that finfish typically had higher levels of PBDEs compared to shellfish with BDE-47 and BDE-99 as the most common congeners detected. Among shellfish, bivalves (clams and mussels) were notable for having much higher levels of OH- and MeO-PBDEs compared to other types of seafood with 6'-OH-BDE-47 and 2'-MeO-BDE-68 being the more common OH- and MeO- congeners, respectively. Based on our results and recent updates to daily fish consumption rates, estimated intake rates for Washington State residents will be between 34 and 644 ng PBDEs/day, depending on species consumed. For the OH- and MeO- forms, daily exposure is much more variable but typically would range between 15 and 90 ng/day for most seafood types. If shellfish are primarily consumed, OH-PBDE intake could be as high as 350 ng/day. These daily intake rates for PBDEs are higher than most dietary intake rates calculated for populations in other world regions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.301},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = C,
volume = 630,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}