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Title: Can Microbial Ecology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Inform Climate Change Models?

Abstract

Our funded research focused on soil organic matter dynamics and plant-microbe interactions by examining the role of belowground processes and mechanisms across scales, including decomposition of organic molecules, microbial interactions, and plant-microbe interactions associated with a changing climate. Research foci included mycorrhizal mediated priming of soil carbon turnover, organic N use and depolymerization by free-living microbes and mycorrhizal fungi, and the use of isotopes as additional constraints for improved modeling of belowground processes. This work complemented the DOE’s mandate to understand both the consequences of atmospheric and climatic change for key ecosystems and the feedbacks on C cycling.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  2. Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1427520
Report Number(s):
SC0008324
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0008324
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; carbon; nitrogen; microbial ecology; biogeochemistry; environmental change; fungi

Citation Formats

Hofmockel, Kirsten, and Hobbie, Erik. Can Microbial Ecology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Inform Climate Change Models?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1427520.
Hofmockel, Kirsten, & Hobbie, Erik. Can Microbial Ecology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Inform Climate Change Models?. United States. doi:10.2172/1427520.
Hofmockel, Kirsten, and Hobbie, Erik. Mon . "Can Microbial Ecology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Inform Climate Change Models?". United States. doi:10.2172/1427520. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427520.
@article{osti_1427520,
title = {Can Microbial Ecology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Inform Climate Change Models?},
author = {Hofmockel, Kirsten and Hobbie, Erik},
abstractNote = {Our funded research focused on soil organic matter dynamics and plant-microbe interactions by examining the role of belowground processes and mechanisms across scales, including decomposition of organic molecules, microbial interactions, and plant-microbe interactions associated with a changing climate. Research foci included mycorrhizal mediated priming of soil carbon turnover, organic N use and depolymerization by free-living microbes and mycorrhizal fungi, and the use of isotopes as additional constraints for improved modeling of belowground processes. This work complemented the DOE’s mandate to understand both the consequences of atmospheric and climatic change for key ecosystems and the feedbacks on C cycling.},
doi = {10.2172/1427520},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {7}
}