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Title: Modeling hydrogen-induced fracture and crack propagation in high strength steels.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1427436
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-2377C
651442
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2016 International Hydrogen Conference, Material Performance in Hydrogen Environments held September 11, 2016 - February 14, 2017 in Moran, Wyoming.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Foulk, James W.,, Dadfarnia, Mohsen, Somerday, Brian, Balch, Dorian K., Sofronis, Petros, Nagao, Akihide, Schembri, Phillip, Nibur, Kevin, and Ritchie, Robert. Modeling hydrogen-induced fracture and crack propagation in high strength steels.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Foulk, James W.,, Dadfarnia, Mohsen, Somerday, Brian, Balch, Dorian K., Sofronis, Petros, Nagao, Akihide, Schembri, Phillip, Nibur, Kevin, & Ritchie, Robert. Modeling hydrogen-induced fracture and crack propagation in high strength steels.. United States.
Foulk, James W.,, Dadfarnia, Mohsen, Somerday, Brian, Balch, Dorian K., Sofronis, Petros, Nagao, Akihide, Schembri, Phillip, Nibur, Kevin, and Ritchie, Robert. Wed . "Modeling hydrogen-induced fracture and crack propagation in high strength steels.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427436.
@article{osti_1427436,
title = {Modeling hydrogen-induced fracture and crack propagation in high strength steels.},
author = {Foulk, James W., and Dadfarnia, Mohsen and Somerday, Brian and Balch, Dorian K. and Sofronis, Petros and Nagao, Akihide and Schembri, Phillip and Nibur, Kevin and Ritchie, Robert},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • The influence of applied cathodic protection levels on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of a number of welded high strength microalloyed steels has been determined. The types of steel and the yield strengths selected, which ranged from 450 to 650MPa, were intended to cover both existing and likely developments in offshore structures over the next decade or so. The steels were welded using the submerged arc process at a heat input of 3kJ/mm and the corrosion fatigue properties of the coarse grained heat affected zones (CGHAZ) were examined using S.E.N. specimens subjected to a loading frequency of 0.5Hz andmore » a load ratio of 0.6 in a synthetic seawater solution. At high over potentials ({minus}1100mV) all steels showed significantly enhanced corrosion fatigue crack propagation rates compared to similar samples protected at {minus}800mV. Growth rates of up to an order of magnitude faster were measured in some cases. Crack path deviation in general decreased as the potential decreased. Much flatter, cleavage type modes of fracture propagation were sometimes observed, indicating that the faster growth rates were associated with hydrogen embrittlement problems caused by the excess hydrogen generated by the cathodic protection process. However, the resulting fatigue performance was found to be no worse than for conventional lower strength 350MPa structural steels which are presently being used offshore. The work examined the influence of alloy composition and microstructure on fatigue crack growth behavior and emphasizes the difficulties associated with assessing and comparing fatigue behavior of welded samples because of the different microstructures which are sampled by the growing fatigue crack tip in conventional test procedures. Finally, the work makes recommendation on suitable high strength alloy types for further development for offshore applications.« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general,more » all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.« less
  • A brittle fracture propagation and arrest model based on the local fracture stress criterion is proposed. Dynamic fracture toughness is calculated as functions of yield stress, local fracture stress, temperature and crack velocity. The model predicts an upper limit crack velocity, which is closely related to the quasi-Rayleigh wave speeds of plastic deformation. The model also incorporates the influence of shear-lips formed near the plate surface and of the crack tunneling. The shear-lips have a pronounced effect on suppressing crack propagation, especially at high temperature, through crack-closure stress exerted on them. A lower bound nominal stress intensity factor, which maymore » correspond to crack arrest toughness, exists and shows a transition behavior with respect to temperature. Associated lower bound crack velocity range agrees with previously obtained experimental data.« less
  • Near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate determinations have been made for four high strength steels in sea water under free corrosion and at cathodic potentials of {minus}0.80v, {minus}0.95v and {minus}1.10v versus SCE for stress ratio 0.8 and the results compared with previous data for stress ratio 0.5. Results for cathodically polarized specimens fatigued at different frequencies showed that the lower the frequency, the higher the threshold. It was also found that the fatigue crack growth rate under cathodic polarization in sea water was dependent upon the magnitude of initial {Delta}K, implying that the da/dN-{Delta}K relation was not unique. The data aremore » discussed in terms of calcareous deposit induced crack closure, and a model is proposed which explains the relative influence of hydrogen and calcareous deposits upon da/dN as influenced by potential, R, initial {Delta}K and frequency.« less