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Title: PFLOTRAN Reaction Sandbox: A Flexible Extensible Framework for Vetting Biogeochemical Reactions within an Open Source Subsurface Simulator.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1427430
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-2373C
651440
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Migraton 2017 held September 10-15, 2017 in Barcelona, Spain.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hammond, Glenn Edward. PFLOTRAN Reaction Sandbox: A Flexible Extensible Framework for Vetting Biogeochemical Reactions within an Open Source Subsurface Simulator.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hammond, Glenn Edward. PFLOTRAN Reaction Sandbox: A Flexible Extensible Framework for Vetting Biogeochemical Reactions within an Open Source Subsurface Simulator.. United States.
Hammond, Glenn Edward. Wed . "PFLOTRAN Reaction Sandbox: A Flexible Extensible Framework for Vetting Biogeochemical Reactions within an Open Source Subsurface Simulator.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427430.
@article{osti_1427430,
title = {PFLOTRAN Reaction Sandbox: A Flexible Extensible Framework for Vetting Biogeochemical Reactions within an Open Source Subsurface Simulator.},
author = {Hammond, Glenn Edward},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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