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Title: Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams to Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing

Abstract

We have successfully created ultra dry carbon-dioxide-in-water and nitrogen-in-water foams (with water content down to 2-5% range), that are remarkably stable at high temperatures (up to 120 deg, C) and pressures (up to 3000psi) and viscous enough (100-200 cP tunable range) to carry proppant. Two generations of these ultra-dry foams have been developed; they are stabilized either with a synergy of surfactants and nanoparticle, or just with viscoelastic surfactants that viscosify the aqueous phase. Not only does this reduce water utilization and disposal, but it minimizes fluid blocking of hydrocarbon production. Further, the most recent development shows successful use of environmentally friendly surfactants at high temperature and pressure. We pay special attention to the role of nanoparticles in stabilization of the foams, specifically for high salinity brines. The preliminary numerical simulation for which shows they open wider fractures with shorter half-length and require less clean-up due to minimal water use. We also tested the stability and sand carrying properties of these foams at high pressure, room temperature conditions in sapphire cell. We performed on a preliminary numerical investigation of applicability for improved oil recovery applications. The applicability was evaluated by running multiphase flow injection simulations in a case-study oil reservoir.more » The results of this research thus expand the options available to operators for hydraulic fracturing and can simplify the design and field implementation of foamed fracturing fluids.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering
  2. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States); Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1427303
Report Number(s):
DOE-UT-FE0013723
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0013723
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Publication related to this project.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ultradry foams; carbon-dioxide-in-water foams; nitrogen foams; fracturing fluid

Citation Formats

Prodanovic, Masa, and Johnston, Keith P. Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams to Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1427303.
Prodanovic, Masa, & Johnston, Keith P. Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams to Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing. United States. doi:10.2172/1427303.
Prodanovic, Masa, and Johnston, Keith P. Fri . "Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams to Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing". United States. doi:10.2172/1427303. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427303.
@article{osti_1427303,
title = {Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams to Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing},
author = {Prodanovic, Masa and Johnston, Keith P.},
abstractNote = {We have successfully created ultra dry carbon-dioxide-in-water and nitrogen-in-water foams (with water content down to 2-5% range), that are remarkably stable at high temperatures (up to 120 deg, C) and pressures (up to 3000psi) and viscous enough (100-200 cP tunable range) to carry proppant. Two generations of these ultra-dry foams have been developed; they are stabilized either with a synergy of surfactants and nanoparticle, or just with viscoelastic surfactants that viscosify the aqueous phase. Not only does this reduce water utilization and disposal, but it minimizes fluid blocking of hydrocarbon production. Further, the most recent development shows successful use of environmentally friendly surfactants at high temperature and pressure. We pay special attention to the role of nanoparticles in stabilization of the foams, specifically for high salinity brines. The preliminary numerical simulation for which shows they open wider fractures with shorter half-length and require less clean-up due to minimal water use. We also tested the stability and sand carrying properties of these foams at high pressure, room temperature conditions in sapphire cell. We performed on a preliminary numerical investigation of applicability for improved oil recovery applications. The applicability was evaluated by running multiphase flow injection simulations in a case-study oil reservoir. The results of this research thus expand the options available to operators for hydraulic fracturing and can simplify the design and field implementation of foamed fracturing fluids.},
doi = {10.2172/1427303},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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