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Title: Dynamic Recrystallization Model for Whisker and Hillock Growth

Abstract

Tin (Sn) whiskers are not a recent development. Studies in the late 1930’s investigated thin filaments that grew spontaneously from Sn coatings used for the corrosion protection of electronic hardware. It was soon recognized that these Sn filaments, or whiskers, could create short circuits in the same electronic equipment. Figure 1a illustrates whisker growth in the hole of a printed circuit board having an immersion Sn surface finish. The engineering solution was to contaminate the Sn with > 3 wt.% of lead (Pb). The result was that whisker growth was replaced with hillock formation (Fig. 1b) that posed a minimal reliability concern to electrical circuits. Today, Pb-containing finishes are being replaced with pure Sn coatings to meet environmental restrictions on Pb use. The same short-circuit concerns have been raised, once again, with respect to Sn whiskers.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Nuclear Security (NA-70)
OSTI Identifier:
1427290
Report Number(s):
SAND-2015-9335J
607652
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Program Document
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Review
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Vianco, Paul T., and Neilsen, Michael K. Dynamic Recrystallization Model for Whisker and Hillock Growth. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Vianco, Paul T., & Neilsen, Michael K. Dynamic Recrystallization Model for Whisker and Hillock Growth. United States.
Vianco, Paul T., and Neilsen, Michael K. Thu . "Dynamic Recrystallization Model for Whisker and Hillock Growth". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427290.
@article{osti_1427290,
title = {Dynamic Recrystallization Model for Whisker and Hillock Growth},
author = {Vianco, Paul T. and Neilsen, Michael K.},
abstractNote = {Tin (Sn) whiskers are not a recent development. Studies in the late 1930’s investigated thin filaments that grew spontaneously from Sn coatings used for the corrosion protection of electronic hardware. It was soon recognized that these Sn filaments, or whiskers, could create short circuits in the same electronic equipment. Figure 1a illustrates whisker growth in the hole of a printed circuit board having an immersion Sn surface finish. The engineering solution was to contaminate the Sn with > 3 wt.% of lead (Pb). The result was that whisker growth was replaced with hillock formation (Fig. 1b) that posed a minimal reliability concern to electrical circuits. Today, Pb-containing finishes are being replaced with pure Sn coatings to meet environmental restrictions on Pb use. The same short-circuit concerns have been raised, once again, with respect to Sn whiskers.},
doi = {},
journal = {Applied Physics Review},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}

Program Document:
Other availability
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