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Title: Frictional studies of a monolayer coated micromachined actuator: Beyond Amontons laws

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1427009
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-0295J
524324
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Corwin, Alex David. Frictional studies of a monolayer coated micromachined actuator: Beyond Amontons laws. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Corwin, Alex David. Frictional studies of a monolayer coated micromachined actuator: Beyond Amontons laws. United States.
Corwin, Alex David. Tue . "Frictional studies of a monolayer coated micromachined actuator: Beyond Amontons laws". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427009.
@article{osti_1427009,
title = {Frictional studies of a monolayer coated micromachined actuator: Beyond Amontons laws},
author = {Corwin, Alex David},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 24 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Jan 24 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Program Document:
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  • A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized inmore » a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion, micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.« less
  • An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical devices and control electronics for those devices. Surface micromachining is the predominant technology under development. Pressure sensors based on silicon nitride diaphragms have been developed. Hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing have been developed. Accelerometers based upon high-aspect ratio surface micromachining are under development. Actuation mechanisms employing either electrostatic or steam power are being combined with a three-level active (plus an additional passive level) polysilicon surfacemore » micromachining process to couple these actuators to external devices. Results of efforts toward integration of micromechanics with the driving electronics for actuators or the amplification/signal processing electronics for sensors is also described. This effort includes a tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing.« less