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Title: Measuring Tree Properties and Responses Using Low-Cost Accelerometers

Abstract

Trees play a crucial role in the water, carbon and nitrogen cycle on local, regional and global scales. Understanding the exchange of momentum, heat, water, and CO 2 between trees and the atmosphere is important to assess the impact of drought, deforestation and climate change. Unfortunately, ground measurements of tree properties such as mass and canopy interception of precipitation are often expensive or difficult due to challenging environments. This paper aims to demonstrate the concept of using robust and affordable accelerometers to measure tree properties and responses. Tree sway is dependent on mass, canopy structure, drag coefficient, and wind forcing. By measuring tree acceleration, we can relate the tree motion to external forcing (e.g., wind, precipitation and related canopy interception) and tree physical properties (e.g., mass, elasticity). Using five months of acceleration data of 19 trees in the Brazilian Amazon, we show that the frequency spectrum of tree sway is related to mass, canopy interception of precipitation, and canopy–atmosphere turbulent exchange.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1]
  1. Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)
  2. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  3. Univ. of Campinas (UNICAMP), Sao Paulo (Brazil)
  4. Oregon Research Electronics, Tangent, OR (United States)
  5. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1426864
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0011094
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Sensors
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1424-8220
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

van Emmerik, Tim, Steele-Dunne, Susan, Hut, Rolf, Gentine, Pierre, Guerin, Marceau, Oliveira, Rafael, Wagner, Jim, Selker, John, and van de Giesen, Nick. Measuring Tree Properties and Responses Using Low-Cost Accelerometers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3390/s17051098.
van Emmerik, Tim, Steele-Dunne, Susan, Hut, Rolf, Gentine, Pierre, Guerin, Marceau, Oliveira, Rafael, Wagner, Jim, Selker, John, & van de Giesen, Nick. Measuring Tree Properties and Responses Using Low-Cost Accelerometers. United States. doi:10.3390/s17051098.
van Emmerik, Tim, Steele-Dunne, Susan, Hut, Rolf, Gentine, Pierre, Guerin, Marceau, Oliveira, Rafael, Wagner, Jim, Selker, John, and van de Giesen, Nick. Thu . "Measuring Tree Properties and Responses Using Low-Cost Accelerometers". United States. doi:10.3390/s17051098. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1426864.
@article{osti_1426864,
title = {Measuring Tree Properties and Responses Using Low-Cost Accelerometers},
author = {van Emmerik, Tim and Steele-Dunne, Susan and Hut, Rolf and Gentine, Pierre and Guerin, Marceau and Oliveira, Rafael and Wagner, Jim and Selker, John and van de Giesen, Nick},
abstractNote = {Trees play a crucial role in the water, carbon and nitrogen cycle on local, regional and global scales. Understanding the exchange of momentum, heat, water, and CO 2 between trees and the atmosphere is important to assess the impact of drought, deforestation and climate change. Unfortunately, ground measurements of tree properties such as mass and canopy interception of precipitation are often expensive or difficult due to challenging environments. This paper aims to demonstrate the concept of using robust and affordable accelerometers to measure tree properties and responses. Tree sway is dependent on mass, canopy structure, drag coefficient, and wind forcing. By measuring tree acceleration, we can relate the tree motion to external forcing (e.g., wind, precipitation and related canopy interception) and tree physical properties (e.g., mass, elasticity). Using five months of acceleration data of 19 trees in the Brazilian Amazon, we show that the frequency spectrum of tree sway is related to mass, canopy interception of precipitation, and canopy–atmosphere turbulent exchange.},
doi = {10.3390/s17051098},
journal = {Sensors},
number = 12,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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