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Title: Rapid Discovery of Potent and Selective Glycosidase-Inhibiting De Novo Peptides

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1426507
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1396628
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Cell Chemical Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-05-22 04:33:51; Journal ID: ISSN 2451-9456
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Jongkees, Seino A. K., Caner, Sami, Tysoe, Christina, Brayer, Gary D., Withers, Stephen G., and Suga, Hiroaki. Rapid Discovery of Potent and Selective Glycosidase-Inhibiting De Novo Peptides. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2017.02.001.
Jongkees, Seino A. K., Caner, Sami, Tysoe, Christina, Brayer, Gary D., Withers, Stephen G., & Suga, Hiroaki. Rapid Discovery of Potent and Selective Glycosidase-Inhibiting De Novo Peptides. United States. doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2017.02.001.
Jongkees, Seino A. K., Caner, Sami, Tysoe, Christina, Brayer, Gary D., Withers, Stephen G., and Suga, Hiroaki. Wed . "Rapid Discovery of Potent and Selective Glycosidase-Inhibiting De Novo Peptides". United States. doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2017.02.001.
@article{osti_1426507,
title = {Rapid Discovery of Potent and Selective Glycosidase-Inhibiting De Novo Peptides},
author = {Jongkees, Seino A. K. and Caner, Sami and Tysoe, Christina and Brayer, Gary D. and Withers, Stephen G. and Suga, Hiroaki},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.chembiol.2017.02.001},
journal = {Cell Chemical Biology},
number = 3,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.chembiol.2017.02.001

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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