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Title: Tolerance analysis through computational imaging simulations.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1426387
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-2477C
651520
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Optical Society of America International Optical Design Conference.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Birch, Gabriel Carlisle, LaCasse, Charles Fredrick,, Stubbs, Jaclynn Javonna, Dagel, Amber Lynn, and Bradley, Jon David. Tolerance analysis through computational imaging simulations.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1117/12.2287292.
Birch, Gabriel Carlisle, LaCasse, Charles Fredrick,, Stubbs, Jaclynn Javonna, Dagel, Amber Lynn, & Bradley, Jon David. Tolerance analysis through computational imaging simulations.. United States. doi:10.1117/12.2287292.
Birch, Gabriel Carlisle, LaCasse, Charles Fredrick,, Stubbs, Jaclynn Javonna, Dagel, Amber Lynn, and Bradley, Jon David. Wed . "Tolerance analysis through computational imaging simulations.". United States. doi:10.1117/12.2287292. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1426387.
@article{osti_1426387,
title = {Tolerance analysis through computational imaging simulations.},
author = {Birch, Gabriel Carlisle and LaCasse, Charles Fredrick, and Stubbs, Jaclynn Javonna and Dagel, Amber Lynn and Bradley, Jon David},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {10.1117/12.2287292},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
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