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Title: Black carbon emissions from biomass and coal in rural China

Abstract

Residential solid fuel combustion makes a major contribution to black carbon (BC) emissions in China. A new estimation of BC emissions from rural solid biomass and coal consumption has been derived from field survey data. The following new contributions are made: (1) emission factors are collected and reviewed; (2) household energy data are collected from field survey data and from the literature; (3) a new extrapolation method is developed to extend the field survey data to other locations; (4) the ownership and usage of two stove types are estimated and considered in the emission calculations; and (5) uncertainties associated with the estimation results are quantified. It is shown that rural households with higher income will consume less biomass but more coal. Agricultural acreage and temperature also significantly influence the amount of solid fuel consumed in rural areas. It is estimated that 640±245 Gg BC/y were emitted to the atmosphere due to residential solid fuel consumption in rural China in 2014. Emissions of BC from straw, wood, and coal contributed 42±13%, 36±15%, and 22±10% of the total, respectively. We show that effective BC mitigation (a reduction of 47%) could be obtained through widespread introduction of improved stoves in rural households

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science - Office of Biological and Environmental Research
OSTI Identifier:
1426185
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Environment (1994); Journal Volume: 176; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Black carbon emissions; China; Field energy survey; Rural solid fuel use

Citation Formats

Zhang, Weishi, Lu, Zifeng, Xu, Yuan, Wang, Can, Gu, Yefu, Xu, Hui, and Streets, David G. Black carbon emissions from biomass and coal in rural China. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.12.029.
Zhang, Weishi, Lu, Zifeng, Xu, Yuan, Wang, Can, Gu, Yefu, Xu, Hui, & Streets, David G. Black carbon emissions from biomass and coal in rural China. United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.12.029.
Zhang, Weishi, Lu, Zifeng, Xu, Yuan, Wang, Can, Gu, Yefu, Xu, Hui, and Streets, David G. Thu . "Black carbon emissions from biomass and coal in rural China". United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.12.029.
@article{osti_1426185,
title = {Black carbon emissions from biomass and coal in rural China},
author = {Zhang, Weishi and Lu, Zifeng and Xu, Yuan and Wang, Can and Gu, Yefu and Xu, Hui and Streets, David G.},
abstractNote = {Residential solid fuel combustion makes a major contribution to black carbon (BC) emissions in China. A new estimation of BC emissions from rural solid biomass and coal consumption has been derived from field survey data. The following new contributions are made: (1) emission factors are collected and reviewed; (2) household energy data are collected from field survey data and from the literature; (3) a new extrapolation method is developed to extend the field survey data to other locations; (4) the ownership and usage of two stove types are estimated and considered in the emission calculations; and (5) uncertainties associated with the estimation results are quantified. It is shown that rural households with higher income will consume less biomass but more coal. Agricultural acreage and temperature also significantly influence the amount of solid fuel consumed in rural areas. It is estimated that 640±245 Gg BC/y were emitted to the atmosphere due to residential solid fuel consumption in rural China in 2014. Emissions of BC from straw, wood, and coal contributed 42±13%, 36±15%, and 22±10% of the total, respectively. We show that effective BC mitigation (a reduction of 47%) could be obtained through widespread introduction of improved stoves in rural households},
doi = {10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.12.029},
journal = {Atmospheric Environment (1994)},
number = C,
volume = 176,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}