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Title: Highly porous CO 2 hydrate generation aided by silica nanoparticles for potential secure storage of CO 2 and desalination

Abstract

Here in this paper, we report a new way of storing CO 2 in a highly porous hydrate structure, stabilized by silica nanoparticles (NPs). Such a porous CO 2 hydrate structure was generated either by cooling down NP-stabilized CO 2-in-seawater foams, or by gently mixing CO 2 and seawater that contains silica NPs under CO 2 hydrate-generating conditions. With the highly porous structure, enhanced desalination was also achievable when the partial meltdown of CO 2 hydrate was allowed.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Western New England Univ., Springfield, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  2. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1426174
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0001114
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
RSC Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 16; Journal ID: ISSN 2046-2069
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Kim, Ijung, Nole, Michael, Jang, Sunghyun, Ko, Saebom, Daigle, Hugh, Pope, Gary A., and Huh, Chun. Highly porous CO2 hydrate generation aided by silica nanoparticles for potential secure storage of CO2 and desalination. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1039/c6ra26366f.
Kim, Ijung, Nole, Michael, Jang, Sunghyun, Ko, Saebom, Daigle, Hugh, Pope, Gary A., & Huh, Chun. Highly porous CO2 hydrate generation aided by silica nanoparticles for potential secure storage of CO2 and desalination. United States. doi:10.1039/c6ra26366f.
Kim, Ijung, Nole, Michael, Jang, Sunghyun, Ko, Saebom, Daigle, Hugh, Pope, Gary A., and Huh, Chun. Tue . "Highly porous CO2 hydrate generation aided by silica nanoparticles for potential secure storage of CO2 and desalination". United States. doi:10.1039/c6ra26366f. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1426174.
@article{osti_1426174,
title = {Highly porous CO2 hydrate generation aided by silica nanoparticles for potential secure storage of CO2 and desalination},
author = {Kim, Ijung and Nole, Michael and Jang, Sunghyun and Ko, Saebom and Daigle, Hugh and Pope, Gary A. and Huh, Chun},
abstractNote = {Here in this paper, we report a new way of storing CO2 in a highly porous hydrate structure, stabilized by silica nanoparticles (NPs). Such a porous CO2 hydrate structure was generated either by cooling down NP-stabilized CO2-in-seawater foams, or by gently mixing CO2 and seawater that contains silica NPs under CO2 hydrate-generating conditions. With the highly porous structure, enhanced desalination was also achievable when the partial meltdown of CO2 hydrate was allowed.},
doi = {10.1039/c6ra26366f},
journal = {RSC Advances},
number = 16,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • Brine extraction is a promising strategy for the management of increased reservoir pressure, resulting from carbon dioxide (CO 2) injection in deep saline reservoirs. The extracted brines usually have high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and various contaminants, and require proper disposal or treatment. In this article, first by conducting a critical review, we evaluate the applicability, limits, and advantages or challenges of various commercially available and emerging desalination technologies that can potentially be employed to treat the highly saline brine (with TDS values >70.000 ppm) and those that are applicable to a ~200,000 ppm TDS brine extracted frommore » the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO 2 storage site in Illinois, USA. Based on the side-by-side comparison of technologies, evaporators are selected as the most suitable existing technology for treating Mt. Simon brine. Process simulations are then conducted for a conceptual design for desalination of 454 m 3/h (2000 gpm) pretreated brine for near-zero liquid discharge by multi-effect evaporators. In conclusion, the thermal energy demand is estimated at 246kWh perm 3 of recoveredwater, ofwhich 212kWh/m 3 is required for multiple-effect evaporation and the remainder for salt drying. The process also requires additional electrical power of ~2 kWh/m 3.« less
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