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Title: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems

Abstract

This Li-ion cell technology development project had three objectives: to develop advanced electrode materials and cell components to enable stable high-voltage operation; to design and demonstrate a Li-ion cell using these materials that meets the PHEV40 performance targets; and to design and demonstrate a Li-ion cell using these materials that meets the EV performance targets. The major challenge to creating stable high energy cells with long cycle life is system integration. Although materials that can give high energy cells are known, stabilizing them towards long-term cycling in the presence of other novel cell components is a major challenge. The major technical barriers addressed by this work include low cathode specific energy, poor electrolyte stability during high voltage operation, and insufficient capacity retention during deep discharge for Si-containing anodes. Through the course of this project, Farasis was able to improve capacity retention of NCM materials for 4.4+ V operation, through both surface treatment and bulk-doping approaches. Other material advances include increased rate capability and of HE-NCM materials through novel synthesis approach, doubling the relative capacity at 1C over materials synthesized using standard methods. Silicon active materials proved challenging throughout the project and ultimately were the limiting factor in the energy densitymore » vs. cycle life trade off. By avoiding silicon anodes for the lower energy PHEV design, we manufactured cells with intermediate energy density and long cycle life under high voltage operation for PHEV applications. Cells with high energy density for EV applications were manufactured targeting a 300 Wh/kg design and were able to achieve > 200 cycles.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Farasis Energy, Inc., Hayward, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Farasis Energy, Inc., Hayward, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
Contributing Org.:
OneD Materials Argonne National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
1425982
Report Number(s):
DOE-FEI-0006446
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0006446
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; Li-ion Cells; High Voltage Electrolytes; NCM; Si Negative electrodes

Citation Formats

Kepler, Keith D., and Slater, Michael. High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1425982.
Kepler, Keith D., & Slater, Michael. High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1425982.
Kepler, Keith D., and Slater, Michael. Wed . "High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1425982. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1425982.
@article{osti_1425982,
title = {High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems},
author = {Kepler, Keith D. and Slater, Michael},
abstractNote = {This Li-ion cell technology development project had three objectives: to develop advanced electrode materials and cell components to enable stable high-voltage operation; to design and demonstrate a Li-ion cell using these materials that meets the PHEV40 performance targets; and to design and demonstrate a Li-ion cell using these materials that meets the EV performance targets. The major challenge to creating stable high energy cells with long cycle life is system integration. Although materials that can give high energy cells are known, stabilizing them towards long-term cycling in the presence of other novel cell components is a major challenge. The major technical barriers addressed by this work include low cathode specific energy, poor electrolyte stability during high voltage operation, and insufficient capacity retention during deep discharge for Si-containing anodes. Through the course of this project, Farasis was able to improve capacity retention of NCM materials for 4.4+ V operation, through both surface treatment and bulk-doping approaches. Other material advances include increased rate capability and of HE-NCM materials through novel synthesis approach, doubling the relative capacity at 1C over materials synthesized using standard methods. Silicon active materials proved challenging throughout the project and ultimately were the limiting factor in the energy density vs. cycle life trade off. By avoiding silicon anodes for the lower energy PHEV design, we manufactured cells with intermediate energy density and long cycle life under high voltage operation for PHEV applications. Cells with high energy density for EV applications were manufactured targeting a 300 Wh/kg design and were able to achieve > 200 cycles.},
doi = {10.2172/1425982},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}