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Title: The meniscus-guided deposition of semiconducting polymers

Abstract

The electronic devices that play a vital role in our daily life are primarily based on silicon and are thus rigid, opaque, and relatively heavy. However, new electronics relying on polymer semiconductors are opening up new application spaces like stretchable and self-healing sensors and devices, and these can facilitate the integration of such devices into our homes, our clothing, and even our bodies. So, while there has been tremendous interest in such technologies, the widespread adoption of these organic electronics requires low-cost manufacturing techniques. Fortunately, the realization of organic electronics can take inspiration from a technology developed since the beginning of the Common Era: printing. Here, this review addresses the critical issues and considerations in the printing methods for organic electronics, outlines the fundamental fluid mechanics, polymer physics, and deposition parameters involved in the fabrication process, and provides future research directions for the next generation of printed polymer electronics.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL); Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  3. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOD; US Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR)
OSTI Identifier:
1425958
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515; SC0016523
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Electronic devices; Polymers

Citation Formats

Gu, Xiaodan, Shaw, Leo, Gu, Kevin, Toney, Michael F., and Bao, Zhenan. The meniscus-guided deposition of semiconducting polymers. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-02833-9.
Gu, Xiaodan, Shaw, Leo, Gu, Kevin, Toney, Michael F., & Bao, Zhenan. The meniscus-guided deposition of semiconducting polymers. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-02833-9.
Gu, Xiaodan, Shaw, Leo, Gu, Kevin, Toney, Michael F., and Bao, Zhenan. Wed . "The meniscus-guided deposition of semiconducting polymers". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-02833-9. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1425958.
@article{osti_1425958,
title = {The meniscus-guided deposition of semiconducting polymers},
author = {Gu, Xiaodan and Shaw, Leo and Gu, Kevin and Toney, Michael F. and Bao, Zhenan},
abstractNote = {The electronic devices that play a vital role in our daily life are primarily based on silicon and are thus rigid, opaque, and relatively heavy. However, new electronics relying on polymer semiconductors are opening up new application spaces like stretchable and self-healing sensors and devices, and these can facilitate the integration of such devices into our homes, our clothing, and even our bodies. So, while there has been tremendous interest in such technologies, the widespread adoption of these organic electronics requires low-cost manufacturing techniques. Fortunately, the realization of organic electronics can take inspiration from a technology developed since the beginning of the Common Era: printing. Here, this review addresses the critical issues and considerations in the printing methods for organic electronics, outlines the fundamental fluid mechanics, polymer physics, and deposition parameters involved in the fabrication process, and provides future research directions for the next generation of printed polymer electronics.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-02833-9},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Wed Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 4 works
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