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Title: Actinides and Correlated Electron Materials

Abstract

The Actinides and Correlated Electron Materials area of leadership spans Los Alamos National Laboratory competency in actinide materials research dating to the Manhattan Project as articulated in the Integrated Plutonium Science and Research Strategy and competency in strongly correlated electron systems dating back to at least the early 1980s. This area of leadership focuses on the goals of discovering, understanding, and controlling emergent electronic states and predictive performance of actinide materials. They are quintessentially linked by the fact that the physics of actinides—and plutonium in particular—are governed by strong electronic correlations. Not only is the electronic structure of actinides dictated by fine details of electron correlations, but chemical bonding and physical structure are as well. Hence, by addressing the first goal of this leadership area we can significantly accelerate progress on the second goal. To understand such matter requires probing the intertwined spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with greater precision and developing models that accurately predict the consequences of these coupled degrees of freedom, on multiple length and time scales and including acute reactivity and effects of self-irradiation phenomena in these materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1425775
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-22012
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Los Alamos National Laboratory; Materials for the Future; actinides; correlated electron materials

Citation Formats

Pietrass, Tanja, Teter, David Fredrick, and Kippen, Karen Elizabeth. Actinides and Correlated Electron Materials. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1425775.
Pietrass, Tanja, Teter, David Fredrick, & Kippen, Karen Elizabeth. Actinides and Correlated Electron Materials. United States. doi:10.2172/1425775.
Pietrass, Tanja, Teter, David Fredrick, and Kippen, Karen Elizabeth. Mon . "Actinides and Correlated Electron Materials". United States. doi:10.2172/1425775. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1425775.
@article{osti_1425775,
title = {Actinides and Correlated Electron Materials},
author = {Pietrass, Tanja and Teter, David Fredrick and Kippen, Karen Elizabeth},
abstractNote = {The Actinides and Correlated Electron Materials area of leadership spans Los Alamos National Laboratory competency in actinide materials research dating to the Manhattan Project as articulated in the Integrated Plutonium Science and Research Strategy and competency in strongly correlated electron systems dating back to at least the early 1980s. This area of leadership focuses on the goals of discovering, understanding, and controlling emergent electronic states and predictive performance of actinide materials. They are quintessentially linked by the fact that the physics of actinides—and plutonium in particular—are governed by strong electronic correlations. Not only is the electronic structure of actinides dictated by fine details of electron correlations, but chemical bonding and physical structure are as well. Hence, by addressing the first goal of this leadership area we can significantly accelerate progress on the second goal. To understand such matter requires probing the intertwined spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with greater precision and developing models that accurately predict the consequences of these coupled degrees of freedom, on multiple length and time scales and including acute reactivity and effects of self-irradiation phenomena in these materials.},
doi = {10.2172/1425775},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 12 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Mon Mar 12 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Technical Report:

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