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Title: The Multi-TW Scale Future for Photovoltaics

Abstract

This chapter is focused on photovoltaics (PV) and argues that this rapidly developing technology is emerging as one of the most important tools policy makers have for meeting COP21 carbon emissions reduction targets. Focusing on the contributions and advancements that PV is likely to make to the global energy system over the next 10-15 years, it gives a basic overview of mainstream PV conversion technologies, summarizes roughly 40 years of research and industrial history then closes with a brief discussion of how PV and energy storage are likely to impact the world's energy landscape going forward. The chapter closely couples an increasingly urgent carbon emissions and climate change problem with dramatic PV advancements over the last 10 years in terms of both performance and cost. Ultimately PV is presented as an extremely useful tool for helping to reduce global carbon emissions with little to no increase in electricity costs, in a timeframe that is meaningful to the global carbon emissions problem.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1425571
Report Number(s):
NREL/CH-5J00-68427
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; photovoltaics; climate; energy storage

Citation Formats

Wilson, Gregory M. The Multi-TW Scale Future for Photovoltaics. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5020283.
Wilson, Gregory M. The Multi-TW Scale Future for Photovoltaics. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5020283.
Wilson, Gregory M. Fri . "The Multi-TW Scale Future for Photovoltaics". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5020283.
@article{osti_1425571,
title = {The Multi-TW Scale Future for Photovoltaics},
author = {Wilson, Gregory M},
abstractNote = {This chapter is focused on photovoltaics (PV) and argues that this rapidly developing technology is emerging as one of the most important tools policy makers have for meeting COP21 carbon emissions reduction targets. Focusing on the contributions and advancements that PV is likely to make to the global energy system over the next 10-15 years, it gives a basic overview of mainstream PV conversion technologies, summarizes roughly 40 years of research and industrial history then closes with a brief discussion of how PV and energy storage are likely to impact the world's energy landscape going forward. The chapter closely couples an increasingly urgent carbon emissions and climate change problem with dramatic PV advancements over the last 10 years in terms of both performance and cost. Ultimately PV is presented as an extremely useful tool for helping to reduce global carbon emissions with little to no increase in electricity costs, in a timeframe that is meaningful to the global carbon emissions problem.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5020283},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

Book:
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Works referenced in this record:

Economically sustainable scaling of photovoltaics to meet climate targets
journal, January 2016

  • Needleman, David Berney; Poindexter, Jeremy R.; Kurchin, Rachel C.
  • Energy & Environmental Science, Vol. 9, Issue 6
  • DOI: 10.1039/C6EE00484A

The climate response to five trillion tonnes of carbon
journal, May 2016

  • Tokarska, Katarzyna B.; Gillett, Nathan P.; Weaver, Andrew J.
  • Nature Climate Change, Vol. 6, Issue 9
  • DOI: 10.1038/nclimate3036

Terawatt-scale photovoltaics: Trajectories and challenges
journal, April 2017