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Title: Beam Positioning and Beam Polarization Monitor Based on Large Area HTS Pickup Coils

Abstract

In this Phase I SBIR Brookhaven Technology Group (BTG) has proven feasibility and de-risked a novel system for non-invasive detection of position and polarization of a charged particle beam. Non-destructive sensing of position of low-current charged particle beams is a critical component of high-energy and nuclear science experiments and in some medical accelerator applications. A current, most popular solution is an RF beam position monitor (BPM). The RF BPM relies on detection of electromagnetic resonant modes in an RF cavity. The method requires a bunched beam and has a limited sensitivity. The BPM presented in this study is based on a High Temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) designed to detect very small, (fT, 10 -15 tesla), variations of magnetic field. A SQUID can in theory detect the position of a DC beam by reading the magnetic field of the beam. Low-temperature SQUIDs require cooling down to liquid helium temperature, which is difficult to realize in a beamline device. High-Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) enables SQUID devices that operate at a practical liquid nitrogen temperature. However, HTS-SQUIDS are manufactured as small, typically 10x10 mm chips, which cannot be effectively electromagnetically coupled to a particle beam. In this development, Brookhaven Technology Group (BTG)more » in collaboration with STAR Cryolectronics (STAR) designed and developed a novel BPM prototype that combines an HTS SQUID with a persistent large area, flexible, HTS coil structure, so-called PERFELXtm. In this project, we leverage the recent availability of wide large area epitaxial HTS films deposited on flexible non-magnetic substrates. The device has one-dimensional sensitivity with an electrical zero (or null), which allows for design of a compact and sensitive BPM. In Phase I, we demonstrated the feasibility of the method. We manufactured and assembled a magnetically shielded BPM prototype. Wide area HTS tapes were laser-cut into seamless, fully persistent pick-up loops or antennas that were magnetically flux coupled to an HTS SQUID gradiometer provided by STAR. We explored two different coil configurations and selected the one that provides the most linear response to a current displacement in a given direction. The device was tested at liquid nitrogen temperature using a wire with electric current to simulate a particle beam. The prototype demonstrated 100 nA resolution and linear response. The device was independently tested at Jefferson National Laboratory. The system demonstrated the expected one-dimensional response with better than 2% linearity along the principal sensing direction.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Brookhaven Technology Group Inc., Stony Brook, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven Technology Group Inc., Stony Brook, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
Contributing Org.:
STAR Cryoelectronics LLC
OSTI Identifier:
1425340
Report Number(s):
DOE-BTG-SC0015270
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0015270
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; SQUID; beam position; electron beam; HTS

Citation Formats

Solovyov, Vyacheslav. Beam Positioning and Beam Polarization Monitor Based on Large Area HTS Pickup Coils. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Solovyov, Vyacheslav. Beam Positioning and Beam Polarization Monitor Based on Large Area HTS Pickup Coils. United States.
Solovyov, Vyacheslav. Sat . "Beam Positioning and Beam Polarization Monitor Based on Large Area HTS Pickup Coils". United States.
@article{osti_1425340,
title = {Beam Positioning and Beam Polarization Monitor Based on Large Area HTS Pickup Coils},
author = {Solovyov, Vyacheslav},
abstractNote = {In this Phase I SBIR Brookhaven Technology Group (BTG) has proven feasibility and de-risked a novel system for non-invasive detection of position and polarization of a charged particle beam. Non-destructive sensing of position of low-current charged particle beams is a critical component of high-energy and nuclear science experiments and in some medical accelerator applications. A current, most popular solution is an RF beam position monitor (BPM). The RF BPM relies on detection of electromagnetic resonant modes in an RF cavity. The method requires a bunched beam and has a limited sensitivity. The BPM presented in this study is based on a High Temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) designed to detect very small, (fT, 10-15 tesla), variations of magnetic field. A SQUID can in theory detect the position of a DC beam by reading the magnetic field of the beam. Low-temperature SQUIDs require cooling down to liquid helium temperature, which is difficult to realize in a beamline device. High-Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) enables SQUID devices that operate at a practical liquid nitrogen temperature. However, HTS-SQUIDS are manufactured as small, typically 10x10 mm chips, which cannot be effectively electromagnetically coupled to a particle beam. In this development, Brookhaven Technology Group (BTG) in collaboration with STAR Cryolectronics (STAR) designed and developed a novel BPM prototype that combines an HTS SQUID with a persistent large area, flexible, HTS coil structure, so-called PERFELXtm. In this project, we leverage the recent availability of wide large area epitaxial HTS films deposited on flexible non-magnetic substrates. The device has one-dimensional sensitivity with an electrical zero (or null), which allows for design of a compact and sensitive BPM. In Phase I, we demonstrated the feasibility of the method. We manufactured and assembled a magnetically shielded BPM prototype. Wide area HTS tapes were laser-cut into seamless, fully persistent pick-up loops or antennas that were magnetically flux coupled to an HTS SQUID gradiometer provided by STAR. We explored two different coil configurations and selected the one that provides the most linear response to a current displacement in a given direction. The device was tested at liquid nitrogen temperature using a wire with electric current to simulate a particle beam. The prototype demonstrated 100 nA resolution and linear response. The device was independently tested at Jefferson National Laboratory. The system demonstrated the expected one-dimensional response with better than 2% linearity along the principal sensing direction.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as March 10, 2022
Other availability
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