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Title: New In-Situ and Operando Facilities for Catalysis Science at NSLS-II: The Deployment of Real-Time, Chemical, and Structure-Sensitive X-ray Probes

Abstract

The start of operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory heralded a new beginning for photon-science-based research capabilities in catalysis. This new facility builds on many years of pioneering work that was conducted at the NSLS synergistically by many scientists from academia, government labs, and industry. Over several decades, numerous discoveries in catalysis were driven through the emergence of an arsenal of tools at the NSLS that exploited the power of emerging X-ray methods encompassing scattering, spectroscopy, and imaging. Thus, in-situ and operando methodologies that coupled reactor environments directly with advanced analytical techniques paved a rapid path towards realizing an improved fundamental understanding at the frontiers of chemical science challenges of the day.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Material Science and Chemical Engineering
  4. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials
  5. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.
  6. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Material Science and Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1425097
Report Number(s):
BNL-203313-2018-JAAM; BNL-203619-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 0894-0886
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Synchrotron Radiation News
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-0886
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Palomino, Robert M., Stavitski, Eli, Waluyo, Iradwikanari, Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen, Abeykoon, Milinda, Sadowski, Jerzy T., Rodriguez, Jose A., Frenkel, Anatoly I., and Senanayake, Sanjaya D. New In-Situ and Operando Facilities for Catalysis Science at NSLS-II: The Deployment of Real-Time, Chemical, and Structure-Sensitive X-ray Probes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/08940886.2017.1289805.
Palomino, Robert M., Stavitski, Eli, Waluyo, Iradwikanari, Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen, Abeykoon, Milinda, Sadowski, Jerzy T., Rodriguez, Jose A., Frenkel, Anatoly I., & Senanayake, Sanjaya D. New In-Situ and Operando Facilities for Catalysis Science at NSLS-II: The Deployment of Real-Time, Chemical, and Structure-Sensitive X-ray Probes. United States. doi:10.1080/08940886.2017.1289805.
Palomino, Robert M., Stavitski, Eli, Waluyo, Iradwikanari, Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen, Abeykoon, Milinda, Sadowski, Jerzy T., Rodriguez, Jose A., Frenkel, Anatoly I., and Senanayake, Sanjaya D. Fri . "New In-Situ and Operando Facilities for Catalysis Science at NSLS-II: The Deployment of Real-Time, Chemical, and Structure-Sensitive X-ray Probes". United States. doi:10.1080/08940886.2017.1289805. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1425097.
@article{osti_1425097,
title = {New In-Situ and Operando Facilities for Catalysis Science at NSLS-II: The Deployment of Real-Time, Chemical, and Structure-Sensitive X-ray Probes},
author = {Palomino, Robert M. and Stavitski, Eli and Waluyo, Iradwikanari and Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen and Abeykoon, Milinda and Sadowski, Jerzy T. and Rodriguez, Jose A. and Frenkel, Anatoly I. and Senanayake, Sanjaya D.},
abstractNote = {The start of operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory heralded a new beginning for photon-science-based research capabilities in catalysis. This new facility builds on many years of pioneering work that was conducted at the NSLS synergistically by many scientists from academia, government labs, and industry. Over several decades, numerous discoveries in catalysis were driven through the emergence of an arsenal of tools at the NSLS that exploited the power of emerging X-ray methods encompassing scattering, spectroscopy, and imaging. Thus, in-situ and operando methodologies that coupled reactor environments directly with advanced analytical techniques paved a rapid path towards realizing an improved fundamental understanding at the frontiers of chemical science challenges of the day.},
doi = {10.1080/08940886.2017.1289805},
journal = {Synchrotron Radiation News},
number = 2,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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