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Title: Aberration-Corrected Electron Beam Lithography at the One Nanometer Length Scale

Abstract

Patterning materials efficiently at the smallest length scales has been a longstanding challenge in nanotechnology. Electron-beam lithography (EBL) is the primary method for patterning arbitrary features, but EBL has not reliably provided sub-4 nm patterns. The few competing techniques that have achieved this resolution are orders of magnitude slower than EBL. In this work, we employed an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope for lithography to achieve unprecedented resolution. Here we show aberration-corrected EBL at the one nanometer length scale using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and have produced both the smallest isolated feature in any conventional resist (1.7 ± 0.5 nm) and the highest density patterns in PMMA (10.7 nm pitch for negative-tone and 17.5 nm pitch for positive-tone PMMA). We also demonstrate pattern transfer from the resist to semiconductor and metallic materials at the sub-5 nm scale. These results indicate that polymer-based nanofabrication can achieve feature sizes comparable to the Kuhn length of PMMA and ten times smaller than its radius of gyration. Use of aberration-corrected EBL will increase the resolution, speed, and complexity in nanomaterial fabrication.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1425048
Report Number(s):
BNL-114469-2017-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Manfrinato, Vitor R., Stein, Aaron, Zhang, Lihua, Nam, Chang-Yong, Yager, Kevin G., Stach, Eric A., and Black, Charles T. Aberration-Corrected Electron Beam Lithography at the One Nanometer Length Scale. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b00514.
Manfrinato, Vitor R., Stein, Aaron, Zhang, Lihua, Nam, Chang-Yong, Yager, Kevin G., Stach, Eric A., & Black, Charles T. Aberration-Corrected Electron Beam Lithography at the One Nanometer Length Scale. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b00514.
Manfrinato, Vitor R., Stein, Aaron, Zhang, Lihua, Nam, Chang-Yong, Yager, Kevin G., Stach, Eric A., and Black, Charles T. Tue . "Aberration-Corrected Electron Beam Lithography at the One Nanometer Length Scale". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b00514. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1425048.
@article{osti_1425048,
title = {Aberration-Corrected Electron Beam Lithography at the One Nanometer Length Scale},
author = {Manfrinato, Vitor R. and Stein, Aaron and Zhang, Lihua and Nam, Chang-Yong and Yager, Kevin G. and Stach, Eric A. and Black, Charles T.},
abstractNote = {Patterning materials efficiently at the smallest length scales has been a longstanding challenge in nanotechnology. Electron-beam lithography (EBL) is the primary method for patterning arbitrary features, but EBL has not reliably provided sub-4 nm patterns. The few competing techniques that have achieved this resolution are orders of magnitude slower than EBL. In this work, we employed an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope for lithography to achieve unprecedented resolution. Here we show aberration-corrected EBL at the one nanometer length scale using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and have produced both the smallest isolated feature in any conventional resist (1.7 ± 0.5 nm) and the highest density patterns in PMMA (10.7 nm pitch for negative-tone and 17.5 nm pitch for positive-tone PMMA). We also demonstrate pattern transfer from the resist to semiconductor and metallic materials at the sub-5 nm scale. These results indicate that polymer-based nanofabrication can achieve feature sizes comparable to the Kuhn length of PMMA and ten times smaller than its radius of gyration. Use of aberration-corrected EBL will increase the resolution, speed, and complexity in nanomaterial fabrication.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b00514},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Cited by: 8works
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