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Title: Substantial convection and precipitation enhancements by ultrafine aerosol particles

Abstract

Aerosol-cloud interactions remain the largest uncertainty in climate projections. Ultrafine aerosol particles smaller than 50 nanometers (UAP <50) can be abundant in the troposphere, but are conventionally considered too small to affect cloud formation. However, observational evidence and numerical simulations of deep convective clouds (DCCs) over the Amazon show that DCCs forming in a low aerosol environment can develop very large vapor supersaturation because fast droplet coalescence reduces integrated droplet surface area and subsequent condensation. UAP <50 from pollution plumes that are ingested into such clouds can be activated to form additional cloud droplets on which excess supersaturation condenses and forms additional cloud water and latent heating, thus intensifying convective strength. This mechanism suggests a strong anthropogenic invigoration of DCCs in previously pristine regions of the world.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [8]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [9]; ORCiD logo [10]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [11]; ORCiD logo [12]; ORCiD logo [1];  [13];  [13]; ORCiD logo [14] more »; ORCiD logo [15] « less
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC)
  2. Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Inst. of Earth Sciences
  3. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC
  4. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Climate Science Dept.
  5. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC; Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China). State Lab. of Earth Surface Process and Resource Ecology, GCESS
  6. National Inst. for Space Research, Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil). Weather Prevision Center and Climate Studies
  7. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)
  8. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Beijing Municipal Weather Modification Office, Beijing (China)
  9. Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. of Physics
  10. Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. of Physics; Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics
  11. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Science and Global Change Div. (ASGC); Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Severe Weather
  12. Federal Univ. of Alagoas (Brazil). Atmospheric and Climate Dynamics Lab. and Inst. of Atmospheric Sciences
  13. Max Planck Society, Mainz (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Chemistry and Multiphase Chemistry and Biogeochemistry Dept.
  14. Max Planck Society, Mainz (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Chemistry and Multiphase Chemistry and Biogeochemistry Dept.; Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)
  15. Amazonas State Univ. (UEA), Manaus-AM (Brazil). School of Technology and Dept. of Meteorology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Science Foundation of China; European Union (EU); Cloud Processes of the Main Precipitation System (CHUVA) project; National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA); Amazonas State Univ. (UEA); Amazonas State Research Support Foundation (FAPEAM); National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq); German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
OSTI Identifier:
1424983
Report Number(s):
BNL-203206-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; AC06-76RL01830; AGS1534670; 91544217; 2009/15235-8; 2013/05014-0; 2013/50510-5; 01LB1001A; 01.11.01248.00
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 359; Journal Issue: 6374; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Fan, Jiwen, Rosenfeld, Daniel, Zhang, Yuwei, Giangrande, Scott E., Li, Zhanqing, Machado, Luiz A. T., Martin, Scot T., Yang, Yan, Wang, Jian, Artaxo, Paulo, Barbosa, Henrique M. J., Braga, Ramon C., Comstock, Jennifer M., Feng, Zhe, Gao, Wenhua, Gomes, Helber B., Mei, Fan, Pöhlker, Christopher, Pöhlker, Mira L., Pöschl, Ulrich, and de Souza, Rodrigo A. F. Substantial convection and precipitation enhancements by ultrafine aerosol particles. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aan8461.
Fan, Jiwen, Rosenfeld, Daniel, Zhang, Yuwei, Giangrande, Scott E., Li, Zhanqing, Machado, Luiz A. T., Martin, Scot T., Yang, Yan, Wang, Jian, Artaxo, Paulo, Barbosa, Henrique M. J., Braga, Ramon C., Comstock, Jennifer M., Feng, Zhe, Gao, Wenhua, Gomes, Helber B., Mei, Fan, Pöhlker, Christopher, Pöhlker, Mira L., Pöschl, Ulrich, & de Souza, Rodrigo A. F. Substantial convection and precipitation enhancements by ultrafine aerosol particles. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aan8461.
Fan, Jiwen, Rosenfeld, Daniel, Zhang, Yuwei, Giangrande, Scott E., Li, Zhanqing, Machado, Luiz A. T., Martin, Scot T., Yang, Yan, Wang, Jian, Artaxo, Paulo, Barbosa, Henrique M. J., Braga, Ramon C., Comstock, Jennifer M., Feng, Zhe, Gao, Wenhua, Gomes, Helber B., Mei, Fan, Pöhlker, Christopher, Pöhlker, Mira L., Pöschl, Ulrich, and de Souza, Rodrigo A. F. Fri . "Substantial convection and precipitation enhancements by ultrafine aerosol particles". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aan8461.
@article{osti_1424983,
title = {Substantial convection and precipitation enhancements by ultrafine aerosol particles},
author = {Fan, Jiwen and Rosenfeld, Daniel and Zhang, Yuwei and Giangrande, Scott E. and Li, Zhanqing and Machado, Luiz A. T. and Martin, Scot T. and Yang, Yan and Wang, Jian and Artaxo, Paulo and Barbosa, Henrique M. J. and Braga, Ramon C. and Comstock, Jennifer M. and Feng, Zhe and Gao, Wenhua and Gomes, Helber B. and Mei, Fan and Pöhlker, Christopher and Pöhlker, Mira L. and Pöschl, Ulrich and de Souza, Rodrigo A. F.},
abstractNote = {Aerosol-cloud interactions remain the largest uncertainty in climate projections. Ultrafine aerosol particles smaller than 50 nanometers (UAP<50) can be abundant in the troposphere, but are conventionally considered too small to affect cloud formation. However, observational evidence and numerical simulations of deep convective clouds (DCCs) over the Amazon show that DCCs forming in a low aerosol environment can develop very large vapor supersaturation because fast droplet coalescence reduces integrated droplet surface area and subsequent condensation. UAP<50 from pollution plumes that are ingested into such clouds can be activated to form additional cloud droplets on which excess supersaturation condenses and forms additional cloud water and latent heating, thus intensifying convective strength. This mechanism suggests a strong anthropogenic invigoration of DCCs in previously pristine regions of the world.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aan8461},
journal = {Science},
number = 6374,
volume = 359,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on January 26, 2019
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